100-Gb/s DQPSK transmission: From laboratory experiments to field trials

Peter J. Winzer*, G. Raybon, H. Song, A. Adamiecki, S. Corteselli, A. H. Gnauck, D. A. Fishman, C. R. Doerr, S. Chandrasekhar, L. L. Buhl, T. J. Xia, G. Wellbrock, W. Lee, B. Basch, T. Kawanishi, K. Higuma, Y. Painchaud

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

123 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We discuss the generation, detection, and long-haul transmission of single-polarization differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK) signals at a line rate of 53.5 Gbaud to support a net information bit rate of 100 Gb/s. In the laboratory, we demonstrate 10-channel wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) point-to-point transmission over 2000 km on a 150-GHz WDM grid, and 1200-km optically routed networking including 6 reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexers (ROADMs) on a 100-GHz grid. We then report transmission over the commercial, 50-GHz spaced long-haul optical transport platform. In a straight-line laboratory testbed, we demonstrate single-channel 700-km transmission, including an intermediate ROADM. On a field-deployed, live traffic bearing Verizon installation between Tampa and Miami, Florida, we achieve 500-km transmission, with no changes to the commercial system hardware or software and with 6 dB system margin. On the same operational system, we finally demonstrate 100-Gb/s DQPSK encoding on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) and the transmission of real-time video traffic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3388-3402
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Lightwave Technology
Volume26
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Oct 15
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 100G Ethernet
  • Optical networking
  • Phase modulation
  • Transmission
  • Wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

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