A behavioral mechanism of how increases in leg strength improve old adults′ gait speed

Azusa Uematsu, Kazushi Tsuchiya, Norio Kadono, Hirofumi Kobayashi, Takamasa Kaetsu, Tibor Hortobágyi, Shuji Suzuki

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We examined a behavioral mechanism of how increases in leg strength improve healthy old adults′ gait speed. Leg press strength training improved maximal leg press load 40% (p = 0.001) and isometric strength in 5 group of leg muscles 32% (p = 0.001) in a randomly allocated intervention group of healthy old adults (age 74, n = 15) but not in no-exercise control group (age 74, n = 8). Gait speed increased similarly in the training (9.9%) and control (8.6%) groups (time main effect, p = 0.001). However, in the training group only, in line with the concept of biomechanical plasticity of aging gait, hip extensors and ankle plantarflexors became the only significant predictors of self-selected and maximal gait speed. The study provides the first behavioral evidence regarding a mechanism of how increases in leg strength improve healthy old adults′ gait speed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere110350
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume9
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014 Oct 13

    Fingerprint

    gait
    Leg
    legs
    strength training
    Control Groups
    Resistance Training
    Plasticity
    Muscle
    hips
    Gait
    Ankle
    Aging of materials
    Hip
    exercise
    Walking Speed
    Muscles
    muscles

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
    • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Uematsu, A., Tsuchiya, K., Kadono, N., Kobayashi, H., Kaetsu, T., Hortobágyi, T., & Suzuki, S. (2014). A behavioral mechanism of how increases in leg strength improve old adults′ gait speed. PLoS One, 9(10), [e110350]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0110350

    A behavioral mechanism of how increases in leg strength improve old adults′ gait speed. / Uematsu, Azusa; Tsuchiya, Kazushi; Kadono, Norio; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Kaetsu, Takamasa; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Suzuki, Shuji.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 10, e110350, 13.10.2014.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Uematsu, A, Tsuchiya, K, Kadono, N, Kobayashi, H, Kaetsu, T, Hortobágyi, T & Suzuki, S 2014, 'A behavioral mechanism of how increases in leg strength improve old adults′ gait speed', PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 10, e110350. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0110350
    Uematsu A, Tsuchiya K, Kadono N, Kobayashi H, Kaetsu T, Hortobágyi T et al. A behavioral mechanism of how increases in leg strength improve old adults′ gait speed. PLoS One. 2014 Oct 13;9(10). e110350. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0110350
    Uematsu, Azusa ; Tsuchiya, Kazushi ; Kadono, Norio ; Kobayashi, Hirofumi ; Kaetsu, Takamasa ; Hortobágyi, Tibor ; Suzuki, Shuji. / A behavioral mechanism of how increases in leg strength improve old adults′ gait speed. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 10.
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