A comparison between cyclists and noncyclists of joint torque of the lower extremities during pedaling

Hidetoshi Hoshikawa, Keiichi Tamaki, Hiroshi Fujimoto, Yuichi Kimura, Hirokazu Saito, Yoshiro Satoh, Yoshio Nakamura, Isao Muraoka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the effect between cyclists and noncyclists of pedal rates on ankle, knee, and hip joint torque during pedaling exercises. Six male cyclists (CY) and seven male noncyclists (NC) pedaled at 40, 60, 90 and 120 rpm with a power output of 200 W. The lower limb was modeled as three rigid segment links constrained to plane motion. Based on the Newton-Euler method, the equation for each segment was constructed and solved on a computer using pedal force, pedal, crank, and lower limb position data to calculate torque at the ankle, knee, and hip joints. The average planter flexor torque decreased with increasing pedal rates in both groups. The average knee extensor torque for CY decreased up to 90 rpm, and then leveled off at 120 rpm. These results were similar to NC. The average knee flexor torque in both groups remained steady over all pedal rates. The average hip extensor torque for CY decreased significantly up to 90 rpm where it showed the lowest value, but increased at 120 rpm. For NC, the average hip extensor torque did not decrease at 90 rpm compared with 60 rpm, and was significantly higher than CY at 120 rpm (CY : 28.1 ± 9.0 Nm, NC : 38.6 ± 6.7 Nm, p < 0.05). The average hip flexsor torque for NC at 120 rpm increased significanly from 90 rpm, and was significantly higher than CY (CY : 11.6 ± 2.9 Nm, NC : 22.6 ± 11.8 Nm, p < 0.05). These results suggest that it would be better for cyclists to select a pedal rate of between 90 to 110 rpm to minimize joint torque, and, as a result, reduce peripheral muscle fatigue.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)547-558
Number of pages12
JournalJapanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine
Volume48
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1999 Oct

Fingerprint

Torque
Foot
Lower Extremity
Joints
Hip
Ankle Joint
Hip Joint
Knee Joint
Knee
Muscle Fatigue

Keywords

  • Joint torque
  • Pedal rate
  • Pedaling
  • Skill

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

A comparison between cyclists and noncyclists of joint torque of the lower extremities during pedaling. / Hoshikawa, Hidetoshi; Tamaki, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yuichi; Saito, Hirokazu; Satoh, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Yoshio; Muraoka, Isao.

In: Japanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 5, 10.1999, p. 547-558.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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