A-few-second synthesis of silicon nanoparticles by gas-evaporation and their self-supporting electrodes based on carbon nanotube matrix for lithium secondary battery anodes

Takayuki Kowase, Keisuke Hori, Kei Hasegawa, Toshiyuki Momma, Suguru Noda

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Rapid gas-evaporation method is proposed and developed, which yields Si nanoparticles (SiNPs) in a few seconds at high yields of 20%–60% from inexpensive and safe bulk Si. Such rapid process is realized by heating the Si source to a temperature ≥2000 °C, much higher than the melting point of Si (1414 °C). The size of SiNPs is controlled at tens to hundreds nanometers simply by the Ar gas pressure during the evaporation process. Self-supporting films are fabricated simply by co-dispersion and filtration of the SiNPs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) without using binders nor metal foils. The half-cell tests showed the improved performances of the SiNP-CNT composite films as anode when coated with graphitic carbon layer. Their performances are evaluated with various SiNP sizes and Si/CNT ratios systematically. The SiNP-CNT film with a Si/CNT mass ratio of 4 realizes the balanced film-based capacities of 618 mAh/gfilm, 230 mAh/cm3, and 0.644 mAh/cm2 with a moderate Si-based performance of 863 mAh/gSi at the 100th cycle.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)450-459
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of Power Sources
    Volume363
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017 Sep 30

    Keywords

    • Carbon nanotubes
    • Composite
    • Lithium secondary batteries
    • Rapid gas-evaporation
    • Self-supporting anodes
    • Silicon nanoparticles

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
    • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
    • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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