A game-theoretic model of referential coherence and its empirical verification using large Japanese and English corpora

Shun Shiramatsu, Kazunori Komatani, Kôiti Hasida, Tetsuya Ogata, Hiroshi G. Okuno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Referential coherence represents the smoothness of discourse resulting from topic continuity and pronominalization. Rational individuals prefer a referentially coherent structure of discourse when they select a language expression and its interpretation. This is a preference for cooperation in communication. By what principle do they share coherent expressions and interpretations? Centering theory is the standard theory of referential coherence [Grosz et al. 1995]. Although it is well designed on the bases of first-order inference rules [Joshi and Kuhn 1979], it does not embody a behavioral principle for the cooperation evident in communication. Hasida [1996] proposed a game-theoretic hypothesis in relation to this issue. We aim to empirically verify Hasida's hypothesis by using corpora of multiple languages. We statistically design language-dependent parameters by using a corpus of the target language. This statistical design enables us to objectively absorb language-specific differences and to verify the universality of Hasida's hypothesis by using corpora. We empirically verified our model by using large Japanese and English corpora. The result proves the language universality of the hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1410360
Pages (from-to)1-27
Number of pages27
JournalACM Transactions on Speech and Language Processing
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Oct
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Game
Communication
Universality
Model
Verify
Coherent Structures
Inference Rules
Corpus
Language
Smoothness
First-order
Target
Dependent
Interpretation
Design
Discourse

Keywords

  • Corpus statistics
  • Discourse analysis
  • Discourse salience
  • Game theory
  • Game-theoretic pragmatics
  • Meaning game
  • Perceptual utility
  • Pronominalization
  • Reference probability
  • Referential coherence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Computational Mathematics

Cite this

A game-theoretic model of referential coherence and its empirical verification using large Japanese and English corpora. / Shiramatsu, Shun; Komatani, Kazunori; Hasida, Kôiti; Ogata, Tetsuya; Okuno, Hiroshi G.

In: ACM Transactions on Speech and Language Processing, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1410360, 10.2008, p. 1-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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