A human fetus development simulation: Self-organization of behaviors through tactile sensation

Hiroki Mori, Yasuo Kuniyoshi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent progresses of ultrasound imaging technology have led observations of fetal intrauterine behavior and a perspective of intrauterine learning. Understanding fetal behavior in uterus is important for medical cares for prenatal infants, because the intervention like "nesting" or "swaddling" in NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) is based on a perspective of intrauterine learning. However, fetal behavior is not explained sufficiently by the perspective. In this study, we have proposed a hypothesis in which two fetal behaviors, Isolated leg/arm movements and hand and face contact, emerge within self-organization of interaction among an uterine environment, a fetal body, and a nervous system. through tactile sensation in uterus. We have conducted computer experiments with a simple musculoskeletal model in uterus and a whole body fetal musculoskeletal model with tactile for the hypothesis. We confirmed that tactile sensation induces motions in the experiments of the simple model, and the fetal model with human like tactile distribution have behaved with the two motions similar to real fetal behaviors. Our experiments indicated that fetal intrauterine learning is possibly core concept for the fetal motor development.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2010 IEEE 9th International Conference on Development and Learning, ICDL-2010 - Conference Program
Pages82-87
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event2010 IEEE 9th International Conference on Development and Learning, ICDL-2010 - Ann Arbor, MI
Duration: 2010 Aug 182010 Aug 21

Other

Other2010 IEEE 9th International Conference on Development and Learning, ICDL-2010
CityAnn Arbor, MI
Period10/8/1810/8/21

Fingerprint

self-organization
simulation
experiment
Intensive care units
Experiments
learning
Neurology
Health care
Ultrasonics
medical care
infant
Imaging techniques
contact
interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software
  • Education

Cite this

Mori, H., & Kuniyoshi, Y. (2010). A human fetus development simulation: Self-organization of behaviors through tactile sensation. In 2010 IEEE 9th International Conference on Development and Learning, ICDL-2010 - Conference Program (pp. 82-87). [5578860] https://doi.org/10.1109/DEVLRN.2010.5578860

A human fetus development simulation : Self-organization of behaviors through tactile sensation. / Mori, Hiroki; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo.

2010 IEEE 9th International Conference on Development and Learning, ICDL-2010 - Conference Program. 2010. p. 82-87 5578860.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mori, H & Kuniyoshi, Y 2010, A human fetus development simulation: Self-organization of behaviors through tactile sensation. in 2010 IEEE 9th International Conference on Development and Learning, ICDL-2010 - Conference Program., 5578860, pp. 82-87, 2010 IEEE 9th International Conference on Development and Learning, ICDL-2010, Ann Arbor, MI, 10/8/18. https://doi.org/10.1109/DEVLRN.2010.5578860
Mori H, Kuniyoshi Y. A human fetus development simulation: Self-organization of behaviors through tactile sensation. In 2010 IEEE 9th International Conference on Development and Learning, ICDL-2010 - Conference Program. 2010. p. 82-87. 5578860 https://doi.org/10.1109/DEVLRN.2010.5578860
Mori, Hiroki ; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo. / A human fetus development simulation : Self-organization of behaviors through tactile sensation. 2010 IEEE 9th International Conference on Development and Learning, ICDL-2010 - Conference Program. 2010. pp. 82-87
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