A ketone/alcohol polymer for cycle of electrolytic hydrogen-fixing with water and releasing under mild conditions

Ryo Kato, Keisuke Yoshimasa, Tatsuya Egashira, Takahiro Oya, Kenichi Oyaizu, Hiroyuki Nishide

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Finding a safe and efficient carrier of hydrogen is a major challenge. Recently, hydrogenated organic compounds have been studied as hydrogen storage materials because of their ability to stably and reversibly store hydrogen by forming chemical bonds; however, these compounds often suffer from safety issues and are usually hydrogenated with hydrogen at high pressure and/or temperature. Here we present a ketone (fluorenone) polymer that can be moulded as a plastic sheet and fixes hydrogen via a simple electrolytic hydrogenation at-1.5 V (versus Ag/AgCl) in water at room temperature. The hydrogenated alcohol derivative (the fluorenol polymer) reversibly releases hydrogen by heating (80 °C) in the presence of an aqueous iridium catalyst. Both the use of a ketone polymer and the efficient hydrogen fixing with water as a proton source are completely different from other (de)hydrogenated compounds and hydrogenation processes. The easy handling and mouldable polymers could suggest a pocketable hydrogen carrier.

Original languageEnglish
Article number13032
JournalNature Communications
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Sep 30

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releasing
Ketones
ketones
fixing
Hydrogen
Polymers
alcohols
Alcohols
cycles
Water
polymers
hydrogen
water
Hydrogenation
hydrogenation
Plastic sheets
Iridium
Chemical bonds
Hydrogen storage
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

A ketone/alcohol polymer for cycle of electrolytic hydrogen-fixing with water and releasing under mild conditions. / Kato, Ryo; Yoshimasa, Keisuke; Egashira, Tatsuya; Oya, Takahiro; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Nishide, Hiroyuki.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 7, 13032, 30.09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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