A lateralized comparison of handedness and object proximity

Carl Gabbard, Misaki Iteya, Casi Rabb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was motivated by the emerging hypothesis that right-handers are more strongly lateralized and perform better on various aspects of functional asymmetry than do left-handers. Right- and left-handers were observed for hand selection responses to a unimanual task of reaching for a small cube in positions of right- and left hemispace, prompting hemispheric decision-making related to hand dominance and attentional (visuospatial) stimuli. As predicted, left-handers did not respond with their preferred limb as consistently across positions as did right-handers. Additional inspection of the task suggests that being less lateralized may not be a disadvantage in this context, and that environmental influence may play a significant role in hand selection for a particular motor event.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)176-180
Number of pages5
JournalCanadian Journal of Experimental Psychology
Volume51
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Functional Laterality
Hand
Decision Making
Extremities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

A lateralized comparison of handedness and object proximity. / Gabbard, Carl; Iteya, Misaki; Rabb, Casi.

In: Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, Vol. 51, No. 2, 1997, p. 176-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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