A marketing perspective of the U.S. International Trade Commission's antidumping actions - An empirical inquiry

Michael R. Czinkota*, Masaaki Kotabe

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antidumping laws can have a profound effect on both domestic and international firms and are increasingly used by nations around the world to reduce competition in domestic markets. In the United States, the International Trade Commission (ITC) is a key governmental agency which determines whether or not to impose antidumping measures on imports and the types of measures to impose. This paper analyzes some of the key factors affecting the antidumping decisions taken by the ITC. The data were gathered in a systematic and comprehensive review of the original case and investigation ledgers of the Commission for all full case investigations conducted from 1980 to 1992. Principal findings are that large firms can use the antidumping process to obtain strategic shelter from foreign competitors even under conditions of growing markets, while smaller firms in more atomistic industries are likely to gain such shelter only in instances of market decline. In addition, current import penetration ratios appear to influence the decision process, while Japanese and other Asian origin of imports seems to have little effect on the outcome. Given the linkages identified, several strategic responses useful to managers are identified.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-187
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of World Business
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Finance
  • Marketing

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