A model of perceived risk for colorectal cancer among Japanese Americans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Despite the higher rate of colorectal cancer (CRC) among Japanese Americans, little is known about their risk perceptions. The objective of this study was to test an exploratory model explaining psychosocial pathways to perceived risk of CRC. Methods. The postulated model was tested using path analysis with data from a random sample of 306 Japanese Americans aged 30 and older. Results. The model fit the data very well: χ2 10 = 10.22, P = .42; goodness-of-fit index = .993; comparative fit index = .999; and root mean square are of approximation = .008. Cancer fear exerted the strongest effect on perceived risk followed by family history. Conclusions. Risk communication for Japanese Americans should be tailored to individual emotional patterns associated with cancer to alleviate fear that may impede accurate risk self-assessment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-257
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume19
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Dec
Externally publishedYes

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Asian Americans
Colorectal Neoplasms
Fear
Neoplasms
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Oncology

Cite this

A model of perceived risk for colorectal cancer among Japanese Americans. / Honda, Keiko.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 19, No. 4, 12.2004, p. 251-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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