A robotic head that displays japanese ‘‘manga’’ marks

Tatsuhiro Kishi, Hajime Futaki, Gabriele Trovato, Nobutsuna Endo, Matthieu Destephe, Sarah Cosentino, Kenji Hashimoto, Atsuo Takanishi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper describes the development of a robotic head with ability to display marks commonly used in ‘‘manga’’ (Japanese comics). To communicate with humans, robots should have an expressive facial expression ability for indicating its inner state. Our previous research suggests that, robots can express its emotion clearly if it perform facial expressions that can adapt with the cultural background of the communication partner. As a first step, we focus on making expressions for Japanese people. Manga mark is a unique and famous way of emotion expression in Japanese culture. In a previous preliminary experiment, we determined facial expressions for the robot KOBIAN-R with manga marks. Those expressions included four manga marks as ‘‘Cross popping veins’’ for ‘‘Anger’’, ‘‘Tear mark’’ for ‘‘Sadness’’, ‘‘Vertical lines’’ for ‘‘Fear’’ and ‘‘Wrinkle’’ for ‘‘Disgust’’. A new head that express these marks was developed. Flexible full color LED matrix display and mechanism for indicating black lines were implemented. Experimental evaluation shows that the new robotic head has over 90% average emotion recognition rates by 30 Japanese participants for each of the six emotions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMechanisms and Machine Science
PublisherKluwer Academic Publishers
Pages245-253
Number of pages9
Volume22
ISBN (Print)9783319070575
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event20th CISM-IFToMM Symposium on Theory and Practice of Robots and Manipulators, ROMANSY 2014 - Moscow, Russian Federation
Duration: 2014 Jun 232014 Jun 26

Other

Other20th CISM-IFToMM Symposium on Theory and Practice of Robots and Manipulators, ROMANSY 2014
CountryRussian Federation
CityMoscow
Period14/6/2314/6/26

Fingerprint

Robotics
Robots
Light emitting diodes
Display devices
Color
Communication
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Kishi, T., Futaki, H., Trovato, G., Endo, N., Destephe, M., Cosentino, S., ... Takanishi, A. (2014). A robotic head that displays japanese ‘‘manga’’ marks. In Mechanisms and Machine Science (Vol. 22, pp. 245-253). Kluwer Academic Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-07058-2_28

A robotic head that displays japanese ‘‘manga’’ marks. / Kishi, Tatsuhiro; Futaki, Hajime; Trovato, Gabriele; Endo, Nobutsuna; Destephe, Matthieu; Cosentino, Sarah; Hashimoto, Kenji; Takanishi, Atsuo.

Mechanisms and Machine Science. Vol. 22 Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2014. p. 245-253.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kishi, T, Futaki, H, Trovato, G, Endo, N, Destephe, M, Cosentino, S, Hashimoto, K & Takanishi, A 2014, A robotic head that displays japanese ‘‘manga’’ marks. in Mechanisms and Machine Science. vol. 22, Kluwer Academic Publishers, pp. 245-253, 20th CISM-IFToMM Symposium on Theory and Practice of Robots and Manipulators, ROMANSY 2014, Moscow, Russian Federation, 14/6/23. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-07058-2_28
Kishi T, Futaki H, Trovato G, Endo N, Destephe M, Cosentino S et al. A robotic head that displays japanese ‘‘manga’’ marks. In Mechanisms and Machine Science. Vol. 22. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 2014. p. 245-253 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-07058-2_28
Kishi, Tatsuhiro ; Futaki, Hajime ; Trovato, Gabriele ; Endo, Nobutsuna ; Destephe, Matthieu ; Cosentino, Sarah ; Hashimoto, Kenji ; Takanishi, Atsuo. / A robotic head that displays japanese ‘‘manga’’ marks. Mechanisms and Machine Science. Vol. 22 Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2014. pp. 245-253
@inproceedings{75da12e46025493890ebadb0a9fe28b8,
title = "A robotic head that displays japanese ‘‘manga’’ marks",
abstract = "This paper describes the development of a robotic head with ability to display marks commonly used in ‘‘manga’’ (Japanese comics). To communicate with humans, robots should have an expressive facial expression ability for indicating its inner state. Our previous research suggests that, robots can express its emotion clearly if it perform facial expressions that can adapt with the cultural background of the communication partner. As a first step, we focus on making expressions for Japanese people. Manga mark is a unique and famous way of emotion expression in Japanese culture. In a previous preliminary experiment, we determined facial expressions for the robot KOBIAN-R with manga marks. Those expressions included four manga marks as ‘‘Cross popping veins’’ for ‘‘Anger’’, ‘‘Tear mark’’ for ‘‘Sadness’’, ‘‘Vertical lines’’ for ‘‘Fear’’ and ‘‘Wrinkle’’ for ‘‘Disgust’’. A new head that express these marks was developed. Flexible full color LED matrix display and mechanism for indicating black lines were implemented. Experimental evaluation shows that the new robotic head has over 90{\%} average emotion recognition rates by 30 Japanese participants for each of the six emotions.",
author = "Tatsuhiro Kishi and Hajime Futaki and Gabriele Trovato and Nobutsuna Endo and Matthieu Destephe and Sarah Cosentino and Kenji Hashimoto and Atsuo Takanishi",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-07058-2_28",
language = "English",
isbn = "9783319070575",
volume = "22",
pages = "245--253",
booktitle = "Mechanisms and Machine Science",
publisher = "Kluwer Academic Publishers",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - A robotic head that displays japanese ‘‘manga’’ marks

AU - Kishi, Tatsuhiro

AU - Futaki, Hajime

AU - Trovato, Gabriele

AU - Endo, Nobutsuna

AU - Destephe, Matthieu

AU - Cosentino, Sarah

AU - Hashimoto, Kenji

AU - Takanishi, Atsuo

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - This paper describes the development of a robotic head with ability to display marks commonly used in ‘‘manga’’ (Japanese comics). To communicate with humans, robots should have an expressive facial expression ability for indicating its inner state. Our previous research suggests that, robots can express its emotion clearly if it perform facial expressions that can adapt with the cultural background of the communication partner. As a first step, we focus on making expressions for Japanese people. Manga mark is a unique and famous way of emotion expression in Japanese culture. In a previous preliminary experiment, we determined facial expressions for the robot KOBIAN-R with manga marks. Those expressions included four manga marks as ‘‘Cross popping veins’’ for ‘‘Anger’’, ‘‘Tear mark’’ for ‘‘Sadness’’, ‘‘Vertical lines’’ for ‘‘Fear’’ and ‘‘Wrinkle’’ for ‘‘Disgust’’. A new head that express these marks was developed. Flexible full color LED matrix display and mechanism for indicating black lines were implemented. Experimental evaluation shows that the new robotic head has over 90% average emotion recognition rates by 30 Japanese participants for each of the six emotions.

AB - This paper describes the development of a robotic head with ability to display marks commonly used in ‘‘manga’’ (Japanese comics). To communicate with humans, robots should have an expressive facial expression ability for indicating its inner state. Our previous research suggests that, robots can express its emotion clearly if it perform facial expressions that can adapt with the cultural background of the communication partner. As a first step, we focus on making expressions for Japanese people. Manga mark is a unique and famous way of emotion expression in Japanese culture. In a previous preliminary experiment, we determined facial expressions for the robot KOBIAN-R with manga marks. Those expressions included four manga marks as ‘‘Cross popping veins’’ for ‘‘Anger’’, ‘‘Tear mark’’ for ‘‘Sadness’’, ‘‘Vertical lines’’ for ‘‘Fear’’ and ‘‘Wrinkle’’ for ‘‘Disgust’’. A new head that express these marks was developed. Flexible full color LED matrix display and mechanism for indicating black lines were implemented. Experimental evaluation shows that the new robotic head has over 90% average emotion recognition rates by 30 Japanese participants for each of the six emotions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84927596967&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84927596967&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-07058-2_28

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-07058-2_28

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84927596967

SN - 9783319070575

VL - 22

SP - 245

EP - 253

BT - Mechanisms and Machine Science

PB - Kluwer Academic Publishers

ER -