A role for rem sleep in recalibrating the sensitivity of the human brain to specific emotions

Ninad Gujar, Steven Andrew McDonald, Masaki Nishida, Matthew P. Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

129 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the impact of sleep on cognitive function is increasingly well established, the role of sleep in modulating affective brain processes remains largely uncharacterized. Using a face recognition task, here we demonstrate an amplified reactivity to anger and fear emotions across the day, without sleep. However, an intervening nap blocked and even reversed this negative emotional reactivity to anger and fear while conversely enhancing ratings of positive (happy) expressions. Most interestingly, only those subjects who obtained rapid eye movement (REM) sleep displayed this remodulation of affective reactivity for the latter 2 emotion categories. Together, these results suggest that the evaluation of specific human emotions is not static across a daytime waking interval, showing a progressive reactivity toward threat-related negative expressions. However, an episode of sleep can reverse this predisposition, with REM sleep depotentiating negative reactivity toward fearful expressions while concomitantly facilitating recognition and ratings of reward-relevant positive expressions. These findings support the view that sleep, and specifically REM neurophysiology, may represent an important factor governing the optimal homeostasis of emotional brain regulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-123
Number of pages9
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jan
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sleep
Emotions
Brain
REM Sleep
Anger
Fear
Neurophysiology
Reward
Cognition
Homeostasis

Keywords

  • Emotion
  • Reactivity
  • REM
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

A role for rem sleep in recalibrating the sensitivity of the human brain to specific emotions. / Gujar, Ninad; McDonald, Steven Andrew; Nishida, Masaki; Walker, Matthew P.

In: Cerebral Cortex, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 115-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gujar, Ninad ; McDonald, Steven Andrew ; Nishida, Masaki ; Walker, Matthew P. / A role for rem sleep in recalibrating the sensitivity of the human brain to specific emotions. In: Cerebral Cortex. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 115-123.
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