Acclimation of respiratory properties of leaves of Spinacia oleracea L., a sun species, and of Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) G. Don., a shade species, to changes in growth irradiance

Ko Noguchi, Kintake Sonoike, Ichiro Terashima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To clarify the way in which the light available for growth affects respiration in leaves of sun and shade plants, we examined the respiratory properties of mature leaves of Spinacia oleracea L., a sun species, and of Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) G. Don., a shade species, that had been grown at various irradiances. In leaves of S. oleracea, the respiratory rates, on a dry mass basis, decreased with time during the night, and the higher was the growth irradiance during the day, the higher was the respiratory rate. The marked decreases in the respiratory rate during the night were accompanied by decreases in the concentration of carbohydrates in the leaves. By contrast, the respiratory rates of leaves of A. mecrorrhiza were virtually constant throughout the night and the absolute rates were lower than those of S. oleracea even though the absolute value of the concentration of carbohydrates and its decrease at night resembled to those in S. oleracea. The maximum activities of respiratory enzymes were also similar to those in S. oleracea. However, the leaves of A. macrorrhiza contained less soluble protein than those of S. oleracea. These results suggest that, in S. oleracea, the concentration of carbohydrates might determine the respiratory rate while such is not the case in A. macrorrhiza. The lower respiratory rates in A. macrorrhiza might be due to a lower demand for ATP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-384
Number of pages8
JournalPlant and Cell Physiology
Volume37
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1996 Apr
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Alocasia
Alocasia macrorrhizos
Spinacia oleracea
Acclimatization
Solar System
Respiratory Rate
acclimation
shade
Growth
leaves
Carbohydrates
carbohydrates
Protein S
Respiration
Adenosine Triphosphate
Light

Keywords

  • Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) G. Don
  • Carbohydrate
  • Energy demand
  • Light environment
  • Respiration
  • Spinacia oleracea L

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science
  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

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abstract = "To clarify the way in which the light available for growth affects respiration in leaves of sun and shade plants, we examined the respiratory properties of mature leaves of Spinacia oleracea L., a sun species, and of Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) G. Don., a shade species, that had been grown at various irradiances. In leaves of S. oleracea, the respiratory rates, on a dry mass basis, decreased with time during the night, and the higher was the growth irradiance during the day, the higher was the respiratory rate. The marked decreases in the respiratory rate during the night were accompanied by decreases in the concentration of carbohydrates in the leaves. By contrast, the respiratory rates of leaves of A. mecrorrhiza were virtually constant throughout the night and the absolute rates were lower than those of S. oleracea even though the absolute value of the concentration of carbohydrates and its decrease at night resembled to those in S. oleracea. The maximum activities of respiratory enzymes were also similar to those in S. oleracea. However, the leaves of A. macrorrhiza contained less soluble protein than those of S. oleracea. These results suggest that, in S. oleracea, the concentration of carbohydrates might determine the respiratory rate while such is not the case in A. macrorrhiza. The lower respiratory rates in A. macrorrhiza might be due to a lower demand for ATP.",
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AU - Sonoike, Kintake

AU - Terashima, Ichiro

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N2 - To clarify the way in which the light available for growth affects respiration in leaves of sun and shade plants, we examined the respiratory properties of mature leaves of Spinacia oleracea L., a sun species, and of Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) G. Don., a shade species, that had been grown at various irradiances. In leaves of S. oleracea, the respiratory rates, on a dry mass basis, decreased with time during the night, and the higher was the growth irradiance during the day, the higher was the respiratory rate. The marked decreases in the respiratory rate during the night were accompanied by decreases in the concentration of carbohydrates in the leaves. By contrast, the respiratory rates of leaves of A. mecrorrhiza were virtually constant throughout the night and the absolute rates were lower than those of S. oleracea even though the absolute value of the concentration of carbohydrates and its decrease at night resembled to those in S. oleracea. The maximum activities of respiratory enzymes were also similar to those in S. oleracea. However, the leaves of A. macrorrhiza contained less soluble protein than those of S. oleracea. These results suggest that, in S. oleracea, the concentration of carbohydrates might determine the respiratory rate while such is not the case in A. macrorrhiza. The lower respiratory rates in A. macrorrhiza might be due to a lower demand for ATP.

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