Adaptive bandwidth control to handle long-duration large flows

Ryoichi Kawahara, Tatsuya Mori, Noriaki Kamiyama, Shigeaki Harada, Haruhisa Hasegawa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We describe a method of adaptively controlling bandwidth allocation to flows for reducing the file transfer time of short flows without decreasing throughput of long-duration large flows. According to the rapid increase in Internet traffic volume, effective traffic engineering is increasingly required. Specifically, the traffic of long-duration large flows due to the use of peer-to-peer applications, for example, is a problem. Most conventional QoS controls allocate a fair-share bandwidth to each flow regardless of its duration. Thus, a long-duration large flow (such as a P2P flow) is allocated the same bandwidth as a short-duration flow (such as data from a Web page) in which the user is more sensitive to response time, i.e., file transfer time. As a result, long-duration large flows consume bandwidth over a long period and increase response times of short-duration flows, and conventional QoS methods do nothing to prevent this. In this paper, we therefore investigate a different approach, that is, a new form of bandwidth control that enables us to achieve better performance when handling short-duration flows while maintaining performance when handling long-duration flows. The basic idea is to tag packets of long-duration large flows according to traffic conditions and to give temporarily higher priority to nontagged packets during network congestion. We also show the effectiveness of our method through simulation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIEEE International Conference on Communications
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event2009 IEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC 2009 - Dresden
Duration: 2009 Jun 142009 Jun 18

Other

Other2009 IEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC 2009
CityDresden
Period09/6/1409/6/18

Fingerprint

Bandwidth
Quality of service
Frequency allocation
Packet networks
Websites
Throughput
Internet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Kawahara, R., Mori, T., Kamiyama, N., Harada, S., & Hasegawa, H. (2009). Adaptive bandwidth control to handle long-duration large flows. In IEEE International Conference on Communications [5198696] https://doi.org/10.1109/ICC.2009.5198696

Adaptive bandwidth control to handle long-duration large flows. / Kawahara, Ryoichi; Mori, Tatsuya; Kamiyama, Noriaki; Harada, Shigeaki; Hasegawa, Haruhisa.

IEEE International Conference on Communications. 2009. 5198696.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kawahara, R, Mori, T, Kamiyama, N, Harada, S & Hasegawa, H 2009, Adaptive bandwidth control to handle long-duration large flows. in IEEE International Conference on Communications., 5198696, 2009 IEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC 2009, Dresden, 09/6/14. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICC.2009.5198696
Kawahara R, Mori T, Kamiyama N, Harada S, Hasegawa H. Adaptive bandwidth control to handle long-duration large flows. In IEEE International Conference on Communications. 2009. 5198696 https://doi.org/10.1109/ICC.2009.5198696
Kawahara, Ryoichi ; Mori, Tatsuya ; Kamiyama, Noriaki ; Harada, Shigeaki ; Hasegawa, Haruhisa. / Adaptive bandwidth control to handle long-duration large flows. IEEE International Conference on Communications. 2009.
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