Adsorption and dissociation of water on LaB 6(100) investigated by surface vibrational spectroscopy

Thomas Yorisaki, Aashani Tillekaratne, Yuan Ren, Yukihiro Moriya, Chuhei Oshima, Shigeki Otani, Michael Trenary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The chemisorption of water (H 2O and D 2O) on a LaB 6(100) surface was studied with reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The clean surface was exposed to H 2O and D 2O at temperatures from 90 K to room temperature, and spectra were acquired after heating to temperatures as high as 1200 K. It was found that water molecularly adsorbs on the surface at 90 K as a monomer at low coverages and as amorphous solid water at higher coverages. Water adsorbs dissociatively at room temperature to produce surface hydroxyl species as indicated by OH/OD stretch peaks at 3676/2701 cm -1. Room temperature adsorption also reveals low frequency loss features in HREEL spectra near 300 cm -1 that are quite similar to results obtained following the dissociative adsorption of O 2. In the latter case, the loss features were attributed to the LaO stretch of O atoms bridge-bonded between two La atoms. In the case of dissociative adsorption of H 2O, the low frequency loss features could be due to either the LaO vibrations of adsorbed O or of adsorbed OH.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-252
Number of pages6
JournalSurface Science
Volume606
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Feb

Fingerprint

Vibrational spectroscopy
dissociation
Adsorption
adsorption
Water
water
spectroscopy
room temperature
low frequencies
Temperature
Atoms
chemisorption
Electron energy loss spectroscopy
atoms
Chemisorption
absorption spectroscopy
Absorption spectroscopy
monomers
energy dissipation
Hydroxyl Radical

Keywords

  • High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy
  • Lanthanum hexaboride
  • Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy
  • Surface vibrational spectroscopy
  • Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Yorisaki, T., Tillekaratne, A., Ren, Y., Moriya, Y., Oshima, C., Otani, S., & Trenary, M. (2012). Adsorption and dissociation of water on LaB 6(100) investigated by surface vibrational spectroscopy. Surface Science, 606(3-4), 247-252. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.susc.2011.09.025

Adsorption and dissociation of water on LaB 6(100) investigated by surface vibrational spectroscopy. / Yorisaki, Thomas; Tillekaratne, Aashani; Ren, Yuan; Moriya, Yukihiro; Oshima, Chuhei; Otani, Shigeki; Trenary, Michael.

In: Surface Science, Vol. 606, No. 3-4, 02.2012, p. 247-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yorisaki, T, Tillekaratne, A, Ren, Y, Moriya, Y, Oshima, C, Otani, S & Trenary, M 2012, 'Adsorption and dissociation of water on LaB 6(100) investigated by surface vibrational spectroscopy', Surface Science, vol. 606, no. 3-4, pp. 247-252. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.susc.2011.09.025
Yorisaki, Thomas ; Tillekaratne, Aashani ; Ren, Yuan ; Moriya, Yukihiro ; Oshima, Chuhei ; Otani, Shigeki ; Trenary, Michael. / Adsorption and dissociation of water on LaB 6(100) investigated by surface vibrational spectroscopy. In: Surface Science. 2012 ; Vol. 606, No. 3-4. pp. 247-252.
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