Advanced computer-aided intraoperative technologies for information-guided surgical management of gliomas: Tokyo Women's Medical University Experience

H. Iseki*, R. Nakamura, Y. Muragaki, T. Suzuki, M. Chernov, T. Hori, K. Takakura

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The availability of the intraoperative MRI and realtime neuronavigation has dramatically changed the principles of surgery for gliomas. Current intraoperative computer-aided technologies permit perfect localization of the neoplasm, precise estimation of its volume, and clear definition of its interrelationships with the eloquent brain structures. This allows maximal tumor resection with minimal risk of postoperative disabilities. Under such conditions the medical treatment has become significantly dependent on the quality of the provided information and can be designated as information-guided management. Therefore, appropriate management of the wide spectrum of the intraoperative medical data and its adequate distribution between members of the surgical team for facilitation of the clinical decision-making is very important for attainment of the best possible outcome. Further progress in advanced neurovisualization, robotics, and comprehensive medical information technology has a great potential to increase the safety of the neurosurgical procedures for parenchymal brain tumors in the eloquent brain areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-291
Number of pages7
JournalMinimally Invasive Neurosurgery
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Oct
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Information-guided management
  • Intraoperative MRI
  • Intraoperative neuronavigation
  • Medical information technology
  • Robotic neurosurgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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