Adverse associations of car time with markers of cardio-metabolic risk

Takemi Sugiyama, Katrien Wijndaele, MohammadJavad Koohsari, Stephanie K. Tanamas, David W. Dunstan, Neville Owen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine associations of time spent sitting in cars with markers of cardio-metabolic risk in Australian adults. Method: Data were from 2800 participants (age range: 34-65) in the 2011-12 Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study. Self-reported time spent in cars was categorized into four groups: ≤ 15. min/day; >. 15 to ≤ 30. min/day; > 30 to ≤ 60 min/day; and > 60. min/day. Markers of cardio-metabolic risk were body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL (high-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, 2-h plasma glucose, a clustered cardio-metabolic risk score, and having the metabolic syndrome or not. Multilevel linear and logistic regression analyses examined associations of car time with each cardio-metabolic risk outcome, adjusting for socio-demographic and behavioral variables and medication use for blood pressure and cholesterol/triglycerides. Results: Compared to spending 15. min/day or less in cars, spending more than 1. h/day in cars was significantly associated with higher BMI, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, and clustered cardio-metabolic risk, after adjusting for socio-demographic attributes and potentially relevant behaviors including leisure-time physical activity and dietary intake. Gender interactions showed car time to be associated with higher BMI in men only. Conclusions: Prolonged time spent sitting in cars, in particular over 1. h/day, was associated with higher total and central adiposity and a more-adverse cardio-metabolic risk profile. Further studies, ideally using objective measures of sitting time in cars and prospective designs, are needed to confirm the impact of car use on cardio-metabolic disease risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-30
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume83
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Feb 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Body Mass Index
Waist Circumference
Blood Pressure
Glucose
Fasting
Triglycerides
Demography
Metabolome
Leisure Activities
Metabolic Diseases
Adiposity
HDL Cholesterol
Life Style
Linear Models
Obesity
Logistic Models
Cholesterol
Regression Analysis
Exercise

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • Automobile
  • Motorized transport
  • Sedentary behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Adverse associations of car time with markers of cardio-metabolic risk. / Sugiyama, Takemi; Wijndaele, Katrien; Koohsari, MohammadJavad; Tanamas, Stephanie K.; Dunstan, David W.; Owen, Neville.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 83, 01.02.2016, p. 26-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sugiyama, Takemi ; Wijndaele, Katrien ; Koohsari, MohammadJavad ; Tanamas, Stephanie K. ; Dunstan, David W. ; Owen, Neville. / Adverse associations of car time with markers of cardio-metabolic risk. In: Preventive Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 83. pp. 26-30.
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abstract = "Objective: To examine associations of time spent sitting in cars with markers of cardio-metabolic risk in Australian adults. Method: Data were from 2800 participants (age range: 34-65) in the 2011-12 Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study. Self-reported time spent in cars was categorized into four groups: ≤ 15. min/day; >. 15 to ≤ 30. min/day; > 30 to ≤ 60 min/day; and > 60. min/day. Markers of cardio-metabolic risk were body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL (high-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, 2-h plasma glucose, a clustered cardio-metabolic risk score, and having the metabolic syndrome or not. Multilevel linear and logistic regression analyses examined associations of car time with each cardio-metabolic risk outcome, adjusting for socio-demographic and behavioral variables and medication use for blood pressure and cholesterol/triglycerides. Results: Compared to spending 15. min/day or less in cars, spending more than 1. h/day in cars was significantly associated with higher BMI, waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, and clustered cardio-metabolic risk, after adjusting for socio-demographic attributes and potentially relevant behaviors including leisure-time physical activity and dietary intake. Gender interactions showed car time to be associated with higher BMI in men only. Conclusions: Prolonged time spent sitting in cars, in particular over 1. h/day, was associated with higher total and central adiposity and a more-adverse cardio-metabolic risk profile. Further studies, ideally using objective measures of sitting time in cars and prospective designs, are needed to confirm the impact of car use on cardio-metabolic disease risk.",
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