Age modifies the association of dietary protein intake with All-cause mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease

Daiki Watanabe, Shinji Machida, Naoki Matsumoto, Yugo Shibagaki, Tsutomu Sakurada*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whether the effect of a low-protein diet on progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality risk differs between young and elderly adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unclear. We conducted a retrospective CKD cohort study to investigate the association between protein intake and mortality or renal outcomes and whether age affects this association. The cohort comprised 352 patients with stage G3-5 CKD who had been followed up for a median 4.2 years, had undergone educational hospitalization, and for whom baseline protein intake was estimated from 24-h urine samples. We classified the patients into a very low protein intake (VLPI) group (<0.6 g/kg ideal body weight/day), a low protein intake (LPI) group (0.6–0.8 g), and a moderate protein intake (MPI) group (>0.8 g). Compared with the LPI group, the MPI group had a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio: 0.29; 95% confidence interval: 0.07 to 0.94) but a similar risk of ESRD, although relatively high protein intake was related to a faster decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate. When examined per age group, these results were observed only among the elderly patients, suggesting that the association between baseline dietary protein intake and all-cause mortality in patients with CKD is age-dependent.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1744
JournalNutrients
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov 13
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Age
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • End-stage renal disease
  • Mortality
  • Protein intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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