Age-related differences in spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces during sprinting in boys

Ryu Nagahara, Yohei Takai, Miki Haramura, Mirai Mizutani, Akifumi Matsuo, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Tetsuo Fukunaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We aimed to elucidate age-related differences in spatiotemporal and ground reaction force variables during sprinting in boys over a broad range of chronological ages. Methods: Ground reaction force signals during 50-m sprinting were recorded in 99 boys aged 6.5–15.4 years. Step-to-step spatiotemporal variables and mean forces were then calculated. Results: There was a slower rate of development in sprinting performance in the age span from 8.8 to 12.1 years compared with younger and older boys. During that age span, mean propulsive force was almost constant, and step frequency for older boys was lower regardless of sprinting phase. During the ages younger than 8.8 years and older than 12.1 years, sprint performance rapidly increased with increasing mean propulsive forces during the middle acceleration and maximal speed phases and during the initial acceleration phase. Conclusion: There was a stage of temporal slower development of sprinting ability from age 8.8 to 12.1 years, being characterized by unchanged propulsive force and decreased step frequency. Moreover, increasing propulsive forces during the middle acceleration and maximal speed phases and during the initial acceleration phase are probably responsible for the rapid development of sprinting ability before and after the period of temporal slower development of sprinting ability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-344
Number of pages10
JournalPediatric Exercise Science
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Aug 1
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acceleration
  • Adolescent awkwardness
  • Biomechanics
  • Children
  • Running
  • Slower growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Age-related differences in spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces during sprinting in boys. / Nagahara, Ryu; Takai, Yohei; Haramura, Miki; Mizutani, Mirai; Matsuo, Akifumi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo.

In: Pediatric Exercise Science, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.08.2018, p. 335-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nagahara, Ryu ; Takai, Yohei ; Haramura, Miki ; Mizutani, Mirai ; Matsuo, Akifumi ; Kanehisa, Hiroaki ; Fukunaga, Tetsuo. / Age-related differences in spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces during sprinting in boys. In: Pediatric Exercise Science. 2018 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 335-344.
@article{ff367ca0872e4510b311f2c8f3251506,
title = "Age-related differences in spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces during sprinting in boys",
abstract = "Purpose: We aimed to elucidate age-related differences in spatiotemporal and ground reaction force variables during sprinting in boys over a broad range of chronological ages. Methods: Ground reaction force signals during 50-m sprinting were recorded in 99 boys aged 6.5–15.4 years. Step-to-step spatiotemporal variables and mean forces were then calculated. Results: There was a slower rate of development in sprinting performance in the age span from 8.8 to 12.1 years compared with younger and older boys. During that age span, mean propulsive force was almost constant, and step frequency for older boys was lower regardless of sprinting phase. During the ages younger than 8.8 years and older than 12.1 years, sprint performance rapidly increased with increasing mean propulsive forces during the middle acceleration and maximal speed phases and during the initial acceleration phase. Conclusion: There was a stage of temporal slower development of sprinting ability from age 8.8 to 12.1 years, being characterized by unchanged propulsive force and decreased step frequency. Moreover, increasing propulsive forces during the middle acceleration and maximal speed phases and during the initial acceleration phase are probably responsible for the rapid development of sprinting ability before and after the period of temporal slower development of sprinting ability.",
keywords = "Acceleration, Adolescent awkwardness, Biomechanics, Children, Running, Slower growth",
author = "Ryu Nagahara and Yohei Takai and Miki Haramura and Mirai Mizutani and Akifumi Matsuo and Hiroaki Kanehisa and Tetsuo Fukunaga",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1123/pes.2017-0058",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "335--344",
journal = "Pediatric Exercise Science",
issn = "0899-8493",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Age-related differences in spatiotemporal variables and ground reaction forces during sprinting in boys

AU - Nagahara, Ryu

AU - Takai, Yohei

AU - Haramura, Miki

AU - Mizutani, Mirai

AU - Matsuo, Akifumi

AU - Kanehisa, Hiroaki

AU - Fukunaga, Tetsuo

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Purpose: We aimed to elucidate age-related differences in spatiotemporal and ground reaction force variables during sprinting in boys over a broad range of chronological ages. Methods: Ground reaction force signals during 50-m sprinting were recorded in 99 boys aged 6.5–15.4 years. Step-to-step spatiotemporal variables and mean forces were then calculated. Results: There was a slower rate of development in sprinting performance in the age span from 8.8 to 12.1 years compared with younger and older boys. During that age span, mean propulsive force was almost constant, and step frequency for older boys was lower regardless of sprinting phase. During the ages younger than 8.8 years and older than 12.1 years, sprint performance rapidly increased with increasing mean propulsive forces during the middle acceleration and maximal speed phases and during the initial acceleration phase. Conclusion: There was a stage of temporal slower development of sprinting ability from age 8.8 to 12.1 years, being characterized by unchanged propulsive force and decreased step frequency. Moreover, increasing propulsive forces during the middle acceleration and maximal speed phases and during the initial acceleration phase are probably responsible for the rapid development of sprinting ability before and after the period of temporal slower development of sprinting ability.

AB - Purpose: We aimed to elucidate age-related differences in spatiotemporal and ground reaction force variables during sprinting in boys over a broad range of chronological ages. Methods: Ground reaction force signals during 50-m sprinting were recorded in 99 boys aged 6.5–15.4 years. Step-to-step spatiotemporal variables and mean forces were then calculated. Results: There was a slower rate of development in sprinting performance in the age span from 8.8 to 12.1 years compared with younger and older boys. During that age span, mean propulsive force was almost constant, and step frequency for older boys was lower regardless of sprinting phase. During the ages younger than 8.8 years and older than 12.1 years, sprint performance rapidly increased with increasing mean propulsive forces during the middle acceleration and maximal speed phases and during the initial acceleration phase. Conclusion: There was a stage of temporal slower development of sprinting ability from age 8.8 to 12.1 years, being characterized by unchanged propulsive force and decreased step frequency. Moreover, increasing propulsive forces during the middle acceleration and maximal speed phases and during the initial acceleration phase are probably responsible for the rapid development of sprinting ability before and after the period of temporal slower development of sprinting ability.

KW - Acceleration

KW - Adolescent awkwardness

KW - Biomechanics

KW - Children

KW - Running

KW - Slower growth

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049949055&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85049949055&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1123/pes.2017-0058

DO - 10.1123/pes.2017-0058

M3 - Article

C2 - 29478372

AN - SCOPUS:85049949055

VL - 30

SP - 335

EP - 344

JO - Pediatric Exercise Science

JF - Pediatric Exercise Science

SN - 0899-8493

IS - 3

ER -