An exertional heat stroke survivor's return to running: An integrated approach on treatment, recovery, and return to activity

William M. Adams, Yuri Hosokawa, Robert A. Huggins, Stephanie M. Mazerolle, Douglas J. Casa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Evidence-based best practices for the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke (EHS) indicate that rectal thermometry and immediate, aggressive cooling via cold-water immersion ensure survival from this medical condition. However, little is known about the recovery, medical follow-up, and return to activity after an athlete has suffered EHS. Objective: To highlight the transfer of evidenced-based research into clinical practice by chronicling the treatment, recovery, and return to activity of a runner who suffered an EHS during a warm-weather road race. Design: Case study. Setting: Warm-weather road race. Participant: 53-y-old recreationally active man. Intervention: A runner's treatment, recovery, and return to activity from EHS and 2014 Falmouth Road Race performance. Main Outcomes: Runner's perceptions and experiences with EHS, body temperature, heart rate, hydration status, exercise intensity. Results: The runner successfully completed the 2014 Falmouth Road Race without incident of EHS. Four dominant themes emerged from the data: predisposing factors, ideal treatment, lack of medical follow-up, and patient education. The first theme identified 3 predisposing factors that contributed to the runner's EHS: hydration, sleep loss, and lack of heat acclimatization. The runner received ideal treatment using evidence-based best practices. A lack of long-term medical care following the EHS with no guidance on the runner's return to full activity was observed. The runner knew very little about EHS before the 2013 race, which drove him to seek knowledge as to why he suffered EHS. Using this newly learned information, he successfully completed the 2014 Falmouth Road Race without incident. Conclusions: This case supports prior literature examining the factors that predispose individuals to EHS. Although evidence-based best practices regarding prompt recognition and treatment of EHS ensure survival, this case highlights the lack of medical follow-up and physician-guided return to activity after EHS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)280-287
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of sport rehabilitation
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Heat Stroke
Running
Survivors
Evidence-Based Practice
Therapeutics
Practice Guidelines
Weather
Causality
Thermometry
Survival
Acclimatization
Long-Term Care
Immersion
Patient Education
Body Temperature
Athletes

Keywords

  • Cold-water immersion
  • Heat illness
  • Road race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

An exertional heat stroke survivor's return to running : An integrated approach on treatment, recovery, and return to activity. / Adams, William M.; Hosokawa, Yuri; Huggins, Robert A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Casa, Douglas J.

In: Journal of sport rehabilitation, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.01.2016, p. 280-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adams, William M. ; Hosokawa, Yuri ; Huggins, Robert A. ; Mazerolle, Stephanie M. ; Casa, Douglas J. / An exertional heat stroke survivor's return to running : An integrated approach on treatment, recovery, and return to activity. In: Journal of sport rehabilitation. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 280-287.
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