Assigning Credit to Organizational Leaders: How Japanese and Americans Differ

Yuriko Zemba, Maia J. Young

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Prior research has shown that Japanese blame organizational leaders more harshly than Americans: Americans blame organizational leaders based on the behavior of individual leaders, whereas Japanese blame leaders based both on the behavior of individual leaders and that of the organization. This finding can be explained by a cultural difference in cognitive orientation to focus on the causal influence of groups but also by a cultural difference in value to subordinate individual goals to group goals. By asking Japanese and American respondents to make credit judgments for positive organizational incidents, the current work tests these two rival explanations. Results support the view that group-based crediting occurs because of perceivers' cognitive orientation to perceive group causality. Implications of this cultural difference and the judgmental processes are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)899-914
    Number of pages16
    JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
    Volume43
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012 Aug

    Fingerprint

    Asian Americans
    Orientation
    credit
    leader
    cognitive orientation
    cultural difference
    Causality
    Organizations
    Group
    Research
    causality
    incident
    organization
    Values
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Keywords

    • credit assignment
    • cultural difference
    • responsibility attribution

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Psychology
    • Cultural Studies
    • Anthropology

    Cite this

    Assigning Credit to Organizational Leaders : How Japanese and Americans Differ. / Zemba, Yuriko; Young, Maia J.

    In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol. 43, No. 6, 08.2012, p. 899-914.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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