Association of circulating calciprotein particle levels with skeletal muscle mass and strength in middle-aged and older adults

Masaki Yoshioka, Keisei Kosaki, Masahiro Matsui, Naoya Okabe, Chie Saito, Kunihiro Yamagata, Makoto Kuro-O, Seiji Maeda*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Calciprotein particles (CPPs) are tiny mineral–protein aggregates consisting of calcium-phosphate and fetuin-A. Recent studies have suggested that CPPs may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and arteriosclerosis. Reduced skeletal muscle mass and strength reportedly contribute independently to increased serum phosphate levels. This finding suggests that reduced skeletal muscle mass and strength can endogenously induce an increase in circulating CPP levels. Therefore, we investigated the potential association between circulating CPP levels and skeletal muscle mass and strength in middle-aged and older adults. One hundred eighty-two middle-aged and older adults (age, 46–83 years) were included in this cross-sectional study (UMIN000034741). Circulating CPP levels were measured using the gel filtration method. Appendicular skeletal muscle mass was assessed using multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis with a tetrapolar eight-point tactile electrode system. The skeletal muscle mass index was calculated from appendicular skeletal muscle mass and height. Handgrip and knee extension strengths were used as measures of skeletal muscle strength. The skeletal muscle mass index was negatively correlated with circulating CPP levels (r = −0.31; P < 0.05). This association remained significant after adjustment for potential covariates (β = −0.34; P < 0.05). In contrast, skeletal muscle strength, represented by handgrip strength and knee extension strength, was not significantly associated with circulating CPP levels. In middle-aged and older adults, a lower skeletal muscle mass index was independently associated with higher circulating CPP levels. The present results suggest that maintaining skeletal muscle mass may prevent an increase in circulating CPP levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)900-910
Number of pages11
JournalHypertension Research
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 May

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Calciprotein particle
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Phosphate metabolism
  • Skeletal muscle wasting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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