Augmented cross-modality: Translating the physiological responses, knowledge and impression to audio-visual information in virtual reality

Yutaro Hirao*, Takashi Kawai

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper proposes the method of interaction design to present haptic experience as intended in virtual reality (VR). The method that we named "Augmented Cross-Modality" is to translate the physiological responses, knowledge and impression about the experience in real world into audio-visual stimuli and add them to the interaction in VR. In this study, as expressions for presenting a haptic experience of gripping an object strongly and lifting a heavy object, we design hand tremor, strong gripping and increasing heart rate in VR. The objective is, at first, to enhance a sense of strain of a body with these augmented cross-modal expressions and then, change the quality of the total haptic experience and as a result, make it closer to the experience of lifting a heavy object. This method is evaluated by several rating scales, interviews and force sensors attached to a VR controller. The result suggests that the expressions of this method enhancing a haptic experience of strong gripping in almost all participants and the effectiveness were confirmed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number060402
JournalIS and T International Symposium on Electronic Imaging Science and Technology
Volume2019
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 13
Event2019 Conference on Engineering Reality of Virtual Reality, ERVR 2019 - Burlingame, United States
Duration: 2019 Jan 132019 Jan 17

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

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