Automatic transformation of environmental sounds into sound-imitation words based on Japanese syllable structure

Kazushi Ishihara, Yasushi Tsubota, Hiroshi G. Okuno

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sound-imitation words, a sound-related subset of onomatopoeia, are important for computer-human interaction and automatic tagging of sound archives. The main problem of automatic recognition of sound-imitation word is that the literal representation of such words is dependent on listeners and influenced by a particular cultural history. Based on our preliminary experiments of such dependency and the sonority theory, we discovered that the process of transforming environmental sounds into syllable-structure expressions is mostly listener-independent while that of transforming syllablestructure expressions into sound-imitation words is mostly listener-dependent and influenced by culture. This paper focuses on the former lister-independent process and presents the three-stage architecture of automatic transformation of environmental sounds to sound-imitation words; segmenting sound signals to syllables, identifying syllable structure as mora, and recognizing mora as phonemes.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEUROSPEECH 2003 - 8th European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology
PublisherInternational Speech Communication Association
Pages3185-3188
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes
Event8th European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology, EUROSPEECH 2003 - Geneva, Switzerland
Duration: 2003 Sep 12003 Sep 4

Other

Other8th European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology, EUROSPEECH 2003
CountrySwitzerland
CityGeneva
Period03/9/103/9/4

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Software
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Communication

Cite this

Ishihara, K., Tsubota, Y., & Okuno, H. G. (2003). Automatic transformation of environmental sounds into sound-imitation words based on Japanese syllable structure. In EUROSPEECH 2003 - 8th European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology (pp. 3185-3188). International Speech Communication Association.