Autonomous learning in maze solution by Octopus

Tohru Moriyama, Yukio Gunji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We tested seven octopuses, Octopus vulgaris, in maze learning experiments. They tried to reach the goal, so as to get a reward, by using various locomotory actions in the path, and sometimes encountered obstacles. They came to select efficient swimming actions in the path; afterwards less efficient tactile actions (crawling, staying put, and so on: these reduce the speed of movement gradually increased, while time to detour around the obstacle was reduced. To investigate whether octopuses reduce time spent detouring around obstacles by estimating their actions in the path, we devised a trade off situation in which octopuses were obliged to use tactile actions even though the set-up also encourage them to use swimming actions. As a result, we could observe that they reduced the detouring time. In that way, we experimentally constituted a perspective as if octopuses looked around the whole maze and estimated their actions. Such a perspective appeared to be autonomous learning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)499-513
Number of pages15
JournalEthology
Volume103
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1997 Jun
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Maze Learning
Octopodiformes
Octopodidae
learning
Touch
Octopus vulgaris
trade-off
Reward
Learning
experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Autonomous learning in maze solution by Octopus. / Moriyama, Tohru; Gunji, Yukio.

In: Ethology, Vol. 103, No. 6, 06.1997, p. 499-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moriyama, T & Gunji, Y 1997, 'Autonomous learning in maze solution by Octopus', Ethology, vol. 103, no. 6, pp. 499-513.
Moriyama, Tohru ; Gunji, Yukio. / Autonomous learning in maze solution by Octopus. In: Ethology. 1997 ; Vol. 103, No. 6. pp. 499-513.
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