AutoSelect: What you want is what you get: Real-time processing of visual attention and affect

Nikolaus Bee, Helmut Prendinger, Arturo Nakasone, Elisabeth André, Mitsuru Ishizuka

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While objects of our focus of attention ("where we are looking at") and accompanying affective responses to those objects is part of our daily experience, little research exists on investigating the relation between attention and positive affective evaluation. The purpose of our research is to process users' emotion and attention in real-time, with the goal of designing systems that may recognize a user's affective response to a particular visually presented stimulus in the presence of other stimuli, and respond accordingly. In this paper, we introduce the AutoSelect system that automatically detects a user's preference based on eye movement data and physiological signals in a two-alternative forced choice task. In an exploratory study involving the selection of neckties, the system could correctly classify subjects' choice of in 81%. In this instance of AutoSelect, the gaze 'cascade effect' played a dominant role, whereas pupil size could not be shown as a reliable predictor of preference.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Pages40-52
Number of pages13
Volume4021 LNAI
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
EventInternational Tutorial and Research Workshop on Perception and Interactive Technologies, PIT 2006 - Kloster Irsee
Duration: 2006 Jun 192006 Jun 21

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume4021 LNAI
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

OtherInternational Tutorial and Research Workshop on Perception and Interactive Technologies, PIT 2006
CityKloster Irsee
Period06/6/1906/6/21

Fingerprint

Visual Attention
Real-time
Eye movements
Processing
Eye Movements
User Preferences
Pupil
Research
Cascade
Predictors
Emotions
Classify
Alternatives
Evaluation
Object

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Bee, N., Prendinger, H., Nakasone, A., André, E., & Ishizuka, M. (2006). AutoSelect: What you want is what you get: Real-time processing of visual attention and affect. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 4021 LNAI, pp. 40-52). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 4021 LNAI). https://doi.org/10.1007/11768029_5

AutoSelect : What you want is what you get: Real-time processing of visual attention and affect. / Bee, Nikolaus; Prendinger, Helmut; Nakasone, Arturo; André, Elisabeth; Ishizuka, Mitsuru.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 4021 LNAI 2006. p. 40-52 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 4021 LNAI).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bee, N, Prendinger, H, Nakasone, A, André, E & Ishizuka, M 2006, AutoSelect: What you want is what you get: Real-time processing of visual attention and affect. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 4021 LNAI, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 4021 LNAI, pp. 40-52, International Tutorial and Research Workshop on Perception and Interactive Technologies, PIT 2006, Kloster Irsee, 06/6/19. https://doi.org/10.1007/11768029_5
Bee N, Prendinger H, Nakasone A, André E, Ishizuka M. AutoSelect: What you want is what you get: Real-time processing of visual attention and affect. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 4021 LNAI. 2006. p. 40-52. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/11768029_5
Bee, Nikolaus ; Prendinger, Helmut ; Nakasone, Arturo ; André, Elisabeth ; Ishizuka, Mitsuru. / AutoSelect : What you want is what you get: Real-time processing of visual attention and affect. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 4021 LNAI 2006. pp. 40-52 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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