Behavior of polymeric substrates in an aerobic granular sludge system

M. K. de Kreuk, N. Kishida, Satoshi Tsuneda, M. C M van Loosdrecht

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    83 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Particulate and slowly biodegradable substrates form an important fraction of industrial wastewater and sewage. To study the influence of suspended solids and colloidal substrate on the morphology and performance of aerobic granular sludge, suspended and soluble starch was used as a model substrate. Degradation was studied using microscopy, micro-electrode measurements, batch experiments and long term laboratory scale reactor operation. Starch was removed by adsorption at the granule surface, followed by hydrolysis and consumption of the hydrolyzed products. Aerobic granules could be maintained on starch as sole influent carbon source, but their structure was filamentous and irregular. It is hypothesized that this is related to the low starch hydrolysis rates, leading to available substrate during the aeration period (extended feast period) and resulting in increased substrate gradients over the granules. The latter induces a less uniform granule development. Starch adsorbed and was consumed at the granule surface instead of being accumulated inside the granules as occurs for soluble substrates. Therefore the simultaneous denitrification efficiencies remained low. Moreover, many protozoa and metazoans were observed in laboratory reactors as well as in pilot- and full-scale Nereda® reactors, indicating an important role in the removal of suspended solids too.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)5929-5938
    Number of pages10
    JournalWater Research
    Volume44
    Issue number20
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010 Dec

    Fingerprint

    Starch
    starch
    sludge
    substrate
    Substrates
    hydrolysis
    Hydrolysis
    Protozoa
    Reactor operation
    Denitrification
    Sewage
    aeration
    denitrification
    microscopy
    Microscopic examination
    electrode
    Wastewater
    sewage
    adsorption
    Adsorption

    Keywords

    • Aerobic granular sludge
    • Filamentous structures
    • Hydrolysis
    • Protozoa
    • Starch
    • Suspended solids
    • Wastewater treatment

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Water Science and Technology
    • Waste Management and Disposal
    • Pollution
    • Ecological Modelling

    Cite this

    Behavior of polymeric substrates in an aerobic granular sludge system. / de Kreuk, M. K.; Kishida, N.; Tsuneda, Satoshi; van Loosdrecht, M. C M.

    In: Water Research, Vol. 44, No. 20, 12.2010, p. 5929-5938.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    de Kreuk, M. K. ; Kishida, N. ; Tsuneda, Satoshi ; van Loosdrecht, M. C M. / Behavior of polymeric substrates in an aerobic granular sludge system. In: Water Research. 2010 ; Vol. 44, No. 20. pp. 5929-5938.
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