Biometric based estimates of net primary production (NPP) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest stand beneath a flux tower

Toshiyuki Ohtsuka, Tsuyoshi Akiyama, Yasushi Hashimoto, Motoko Inatomi, Toru Sakai, Shugang Jia, Wenhong Mo, Satoshi Tsuda, Hiroshi Koizumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We measured the forest biomass and biometrically derived net primary production (NPP) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest stand beneath a flux tower. NPP was calculated as the sum of the living biomass of new-season tissue in all organs (B) and biomass of new-season tissue lost due to death (L). Annual leaf-litter production was adopted as L. We regarded the total tree growth in the stand as B, and examined three methods for estimating B to discuss the practicality of continuous measurement of NPP to compare with corresponding estimates of eddy-covariance based net ecosystem exchange (NEE). The three methods were diameter at breast height (DBH)-growth allometry by stem analysis of sample trees (SA method), DBH-growth allometry by core sample analysis of sample trees (CS method) and direct measurement of stem growth by tree census (TC method). The total annual tree growth in the forest stand estimated by the SA, CS and TC methods was 2.26, 1.60 and 2.38 Mg ha-1, respectively, and NPP was 5.64, 4.98 and 5.74 Mg ha-1. The slope of the regression of DBH against annual tree growth was slightly smaller for the CS method than for the SA method; the CS method underestimated the growth of several sample trees that had no clear main stem and, as a result, greatly underestimated B. To estimate B, the SA and CS methods depend on the use of DBH-growth allometry. Thus, it is difficult to determine species-dependent growth in natural mixed forests by these methods if only a few sample trees are used. In contrast, the TC method can directly and continuously measure the growth of all tree stems. Therefore, the TC method is the most suitable method for measuring NPP through annual measurements of tree diameter and leaf-litter production allowing for direct comparison with eddy-covariance based estimate of NEE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-38
Number of pages12
JournalAgricultural and Forest Meteorology
Volume134
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Nov 30
Externally publishedYes

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biometry
net primary production
temperate forests
temperate forest
deciduous forests
deciduous forest
forest stands
primary productivity
tree and stand measurements
methodology
allometry
stem
tree growth
net ecosystem exchange
eddy covariance
method
leaf litter
plant litter
stems
biomass

Keywords

  • Biometric method
  • Carbon uptake
  • Cool-temperate forest
  • Forest biomass
  • Net primary production

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Biometric based estimates of net primary production (NPP) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest stand beneath a flux tower. / Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Hashimoto, Yasushi; Inatomi, Motoko; Sakai, Toru; Jia, Shugang; Mo, Wenhong; Tsuda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Hiroshi.

In: Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, Vol. 134, No. 1-4, 30.11.2005, p. 27-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ohtsuka, T, Akiyama, T, Hashimoto, Y, Inatomi, M, Sakai, T, Jia, S, Mo, W, Tsuda, S & Koizumi, H 2005, 'Biometric based estimates of net primary production (NPP) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest stand beneath a flux tower', Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, vol. 134, no. 1-4, pp. 27-38. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2005.11.005
Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki ; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi ; Hashimoto, Yasushi ; Inatomi, Motoko ; Sakai, Toru ; Jia, Shugang ; Mo, Wenhong ; Tsuda, Satoshi ; Koizumi, Hiroshi. / Biometric based estimates of net primary production (NPP) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest stand beneath a flux tower. In: Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. 2005 ; Vol. 134, No. 1-4. pp. 27-38.
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abstract = "We measured the forest biomass and biometrically derived net primary production (NPP) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest stand beneath a flux tower. NPP was calculated as the sum of the living biomass of new-season tissue in all organs (B) and biomass of new-season tissue lost due to death (L). Annual leaf-litter production was adopted as L. We regarded the total tree growth in the stand as B, and examined three methods for estimating B to discuss the practicality of continuous measurement of NPP to compare with corresponding estimates of eddy-covariance based net ecosystem exchange (NEE). The three methods were diameter at breast height (DBH)-growth allometry by stem analysis of sample trees (SA method), DBH-growth allometry by core sample analysis of sample trees (CS method) and direct measurement of stem growth by tree census (TC method). The total annual tree growth in the forest stand estimated by the SA, CS and TC methods was 2.26, 1.60 and 2.38 Mg ha-1, respectively, and NPP was 5.64, 4.98 and 5.74 Mg ha-1. The slope of the regression of DBH against annual tree growth was slightly smaller for the CS method than for the SA method; the CS method underestimated the growth of several sample trees that had no clear main stem and, as a result, greatly underestimated B. To estimate B, the SA and CS methods depend on the use of DBH-growth allometry. Thus, it is difficult to determine species-dependent growth in natural mixed forests by these methods if only a few sample trees are used. In contrast, the TC method can directly and continuously measure the growth of all tree stems. Therefore, the TC method is the most suitable method for measuring NPP through annual measurements of tree diameter and leaf-litter production allowing for direct comparison with eddy-covariance based estimate of NEE.",
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AU - Hashimoto, Yasushi

AU - Inatomi, Motoko

AU - Sakai, Toru

AU - Jia, Shugang

AU - Mo, Wenhong

AU - Tsuda, Satoshi

AU - Koizumi, Hiroshi

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N2 - We measured the forest biomass and biometrically derived net primary production (NPP) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest stand beneath a flux tower. NPP was calculated as the sum of the living biomass of new-season tissue in all organs (B) and biomass of new-season tissue lost due to death (L). Annual leaf-litter production was adopted as L. We regarded the total tree growth in the stand as B, and examined three methods for estimating B to discuss the practicality of continuous measurement of NPP to compare with corresponding estimates of eddy-covariance based net ecosystem exchange (NEE). The three methods were diameter at breast height (DBH)-growth allometry by stem analysis of sample trees (SA method), DBH-growth allometry by core sample analysis of sample trees (CS method) and direct measurement of stem growth by tree census (TC method). The total annual tree growth in the forest stand estimated by the SA, CS and TC methods was 2.26, 1.60 and 2.38 Mg ha-1, respectively, and NPP was 5.64, 4.98 and 5.74 Mg ha-1. The slope of the regression of DBH against annual tree growth was slightly smaller for the CS method than for the SA method; the CS method underestimated the growth of several sample trees that had no clear main stem and, as a result, greatly underestimated B. To estimate B, the SA and CS methods depend on the use of DBH-growth allometry. Thus, it is difficult to determine species-dependent growth in natural mixed forests by these methods if only a few sample trees are used. In contrast, the TC method can directly and continuously measure the growth of all tree stems. Therefore, the TC method is the most suitable method for measuring NPP through annual measurements of tree diameter and leaf-litter production allowing for direct comparison with eddy-covariance based estimate of NEE.

AB - We measured the forest biomass and biometrically derived net primary production (NPP) in a cool-temperate deciduous forest stand beneath a flux tower. NPP was calculated as the sum of the living biomass of new-season tissue in all organs (B) and biomass of new-season tissue lost due to death (L). Annual leaf-litter production was adopted as L. We regarded the total tree growth in the stand as B, and examined three methods for estimating B to discuss the practicality of continuous measurement of NPP to compare with corresponding estimates of eddy-covariance based net ecosystem exchange (NEE). The three methods were diameter at breast height (DBH)-growth allometry by stem analysis of sample trees (SA method), DBH-growth allometry by core sample analysis of sample trees (CS method) and direct measurement of stem growth by tree census (TC method). The total annual tree growth in the forest stand estimated by the SA, CS and TC methods was 2.26, 1.60 and 2.38 Mg ha-1, respectively, and NPP was 5.64, 4.98 and 5.74 Mg ha-1. The slope of the regression of DBH against annual tree growth was slightly smaller for the CS method than for the SA method; the CS method underestimated the growth of several sample trees that had no clear main stem and, as a result, greatly underestimated B. To estimate B, the SA and CS methods depend on the use of DBH-growth allometry. Thus, it is difficult to determine species-dependent growth in natural mixed forests by these methods if only a few sample trees are used. In contrast, the TC method can directly and continuously measure the growth of all tree stems. Therefore, the TC method is the most suitable method for measuring NPP through annual measurements of tree diameter and leaf-litter production allowing for direct comparison with eddy-covariance based estimate of NEE.

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