Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold-sensitive young trained females

Naoto Fujii, Erii Aoki-Murakami, Bun Tsuji, Glen P. Kenny, Kei Nagashima, Narihiko Kondo, Takeshi Nishiyasu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We evaluated cold sensation at rest and in response to exercise-induced changes in core and skin temperatures in cold-sensitive exercise trained females. Fifty-eight trained young females were screened by a questionnaire, selecting cold-sensitive (Cold-sensitive, n = 7) and non-cold-sensitive (Control, n = 7) individuals. Participants rested in a room at 29.5°C for ~100 min after which ambient temperature was reduced to 23.5°C where they remained resting for 60 min. Participants then performed 30-min of moderate intensity cycling (50% peak oxygen uptake) followed by a 60-min recovery. Core and mean skin temperatures and cold sensation over the whole-body and extremities (fingers and toes) were assessed throughout. Resting core temperature was lower in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group (36.4 ± 0.3 vs. 36.7 ± 0.2°C). Core temperature increased to similar levels at end-exercise (~37.2°C) and gradually returned to near preexercise rest levels at the end of recovery (>36.6°C). Whole-body cold sensation was greater in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group during resting at a room temperature of 23.5°C only without a difference in mean skin temperature between groups. In contrast, cold sensation of the extremities was greater in the Cold-sensitive group prior to, during and following exercise albeit this was not paralleled by differences in mean extremity skin temperature. We show that young trained females who are sensitive to cold exhibit augmented whole-body cold sensation during rest under temperate ambient conditions. However, this response is diminished during and following exercise. In contrast, cold sensation of extremities is augmented during resting that persists during and following exercise.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere13465
    JournalPhysiological Reports
    Volume5
    Issue number20
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017 Nov 1

    Fingerprint

    Body Temperature
    Skin Temperature
    Extremities
    Temperature
    Control Groups
    Toes
    Fingers
    Oxygen

    Keywords

    • Behavioral thermoregulation
    • Cold disorder
    • perceptual thermal sensitivity
    • thermal comfort

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Physiology
    • Physiology (medical)

    Cite this

    Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold-sensitive young trained females. / Fujii, Naoto; Aoki-Murakami, Erii; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P.; Nagashima, Kei; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi.

    In: Physiological Reports, Vol. 5, No. 20, e13465, 01.11.2017.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Fujii, Naoto ; Aoki-Murakami, Erii ; Tsuji, Bun ; Kenny, Glen P. ; Nagashima, Kei ; Kondo, Narihiko ; Nishiyasu, Takeshi. / Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold-sensitive young trained females. In: Physiological Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 5, No. 20.
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