Brain activity associated with dual-task management differs depending on the combinations of response modalities

Hideki Mochizuki, Manabu Tashiro, Jiro Gyoba, Miho Kitamura, Nobuyuki Okamura, Masatoshi Itoh, Kazuhiko Yanai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several functional imaging studies have demonstrated the importance of fronto-parietal network in dual-task management. However, neural correlates underlying the difference in intensity of dual-task interference between the same and different response modalities remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between brain activity associated with dual-task management and the combinations of response modalities. We used the dual-task requiring bilateral finger responses (DT-same condition) and that requiring finger and oral responses (DT-different condition) to visual and auditory stimuli. The right premotor cortex, precuneus and right posterior parietal cortex were significantly activated in the DT-same condition. The neural activities in the right premotor cortex significantly correlated to the delayed responses in the DT-same condition relative to the single-task conditions, indicating that the right premotor cortex is partly associated with dual-task management (i.e., the regulation of information flow). In addition, neural activity in this brain region was significantly higher in the DT-same condition than in the DT-different condition, suggesting that the difference in intensity between the same and different response modalities is partly associated with difference in the load on the premotor cortex between the DT-same and DT-different conditions. The significant activation of the parietal cortex also differed between the DT-same and DT-different conditions. These results demonstrate that brain activity associated with dual-task management differs depending on the combination of response modalities and that such a difference in brain activity, particularly in the right premotor cortex, might be partly associated with the difference in intensity of dual-task interference between the DT-same and DT-different conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-92
Number of pages11
JournalBrain Research
Volume1172
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Oct 3
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Combinations of response modalities
  • Dual-task management
  • Parietal cortex
  • Premotor cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Brain activity associated with dual-task management differs depending on the combinations of response modalities. / Mochizuki, Hideki; Tashiro, Manabu; Gyoba, Jiro; Kitamura, Miho; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Itoh, Masatoshi; Yanai, Kazuhiko.

In: Brain Research, Vol. 1172, No. 1, 03.10.2007, p. 82-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mochizuki, Hideki ; Tashiro, Manabu ; Gyoba, Jiro ; Kitamura, Miho ; Okamura, Nobuyuki ; Itoh, Masatoshi ; Yanai, Kazuhiko. / Brain activity associated with dual-task management differs depending on the combinations of response modalities. In: Brain Research. 2007 ; Vol. 1172, No. 1. pp. 82-92.
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