Brain signal recognition and conversion towards symbiosis with ambulatory humanoids

Yasuo Matsuyama, Keita Noguchi, Takashi Hatakeyama, Nimiko Ochiai, Tatsuro Hori

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Human-humanoid symbiosis by using brain signals is presented. Humans issue two types of brain signals. One is non-invasive NIRS giving oxygenated hemoglobin concentration change and tissue oxygeneration index. The other is a set of neural spike trains (measured on macaques for safety compliance). In addition to such brain signals, human motions are combined so that rich in carbo information is provided for the operation of a humanoid which is a representative of in silico information processing appliances. The total system contains a recognition engine of an HMM/SVM-embedded Bayesian network so that the in carbo signals are integrated, recognized and converted to operate the humanoid. This well-folded system has made it possible to operate the humanoid by thinking alone using a conventional PC. The designed system's ability of transducing sensory information is expected to lead to amusement systems, rehabilitation and prostheses.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
    Pages101-111
    Number of pages11
    Volume6334 LNAI
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    Event2010 International Conference on Brain Informatics, BI 2010 - Toronto, ON
    Duration: 2010 Aug 282010 Aug 30

    Publication series

    NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
    Volume6334 LNAI
    ISSN (Print)03029743
    ISSN (Electronic)16113349

    Other

    Other2010 International Conference on Brain Informatics, BI 2010
    CityToronto, ON
    Period10/8/2810/8/30

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Computer Science(all)
    • Theoretical Computer Science

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  • Cite this

    Matsuyama, Y., Noguchi, K., Hatakeyama, T., Ochiai, N., & Hori, T. (2010). Brain signal recognition and conversion towards symbiosis with ambulatory humanoids. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 6334 LNAI, pp. 101-111). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6334 LNAI). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-15314-3_10