Building Back Better: Do Post-Earthquake Neighborhoods Promote Active Aging? A Long-Term Audit Analysis in Christchurch, New Zealand

Angela Curl, Michael Annear*, Sally Keeling, Georgina Hackett

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The design of urban environments often influences neighborhood physical activity and is crucial to supporting the health and mobility of aging urban populations. However, changes to urban infrastructure take time to implement and are rarely evaluated over long periods. In this study, we examined the long-term outcomes of rapid urban change and rebuilding following a sequence of devastating earthquakes in Christchurch, New Zealand. The study drew on a novel mixed-methods approach, including on-site environmental audits, desktop spatial analyses, and subjective auditor observations, to track support for active aging over a decade of post-disaster rebuilding in 10 aging neighborhoods.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Aging and Environment
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Active aging
  • earthquake disaster
  • environmental audit
  • longitudinal
  • rebuild

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health(social science)
  • Gerontology
  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)

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