Built environmental factors and adults' travel behaviors

Role of street layout and local destinations

MohammadJavad Koohsari, Neville Owen, Rachel Cole, Suzanne Mavoa, Koichiro Oka, Tomoya Hanibuchi, Takemi Sugiyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Street layout is consistently associated with adults' travel behaviors, however factors influencing this association are unclear. We examined associations of street layout with travel behaviors: walking for transport (WT) and car use; and, the extent to which these relationships may be accounted for by availability of local destinations. A 24-h travel diary was completed in 2009 by 16,345 adult participants of the South-East Queensland Household Travel Survey, Australia. Three travel-behavior outcomes were derived: any home-based WT; over 30 min of home-based WT; and, over 60 min of car use. For street layout, a space syntax measure of street integration was calculated for each Statistical Area 1 (SA1, the smallest geographic unit in Australia). An objective measure of availability of destinations – Walk Score – was also derived for each SA1. Logistic regression examined associations of street layout with travel behaviors. Mediation analyses examined to what extent availability of destinations explained the associations. Street integration was significantly associated with travel behaviors. Each one-decile increment in street integration was associated with an 18% (95%CI: 1.15, 1.21) higher odds of any home-based WT; a 10% (95%CI: 1.06, 1.15) higher odds of over 30 min of home-based WT; and a 5% (95%CI: 0.94, 0.96) lower odds of using a car over 60 min. Local destinations partially mediated the effects of street layout on travel behaviors. Well-connected street layout contributes to active travel partially through availability of more local destinations. Urban design strategies need to address street layout and destinations to promote active travel among residents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-128
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume96
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Mar 1

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Walking
Queensland
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Neighborhood
  • Sitting time
  • Travel behavior
  • Urban design
  • Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Built environmental factors and adults' travel behaviors : Role of street layout and local destinations. / Koohsari, MohammadJavad; Owen, Neville; Cole, Rachel; Mavoa, Suzanne; Oka, Koichiro; Hanibuchi, Tomoya; Sugiyama, Takemi.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 96, 01.03.2017, p. 124-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koohsari, MohammadJavad ; Owen, Neville ; Cole, Rachel ; Mavoa, Suzanne ; Oka, Koichiro ; Hanibuchi, Tomoya ; Sugiyama, Takemi. / Built environmental factors and adults' travel behaviors : Role of street layout and local destinations. In: Preventive Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 96. pp. 124-128.
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