Caenorhabditis elegans SNAP-29 is required for organellar integrity of the endomembrane system and general exocytosis in intestinal epithelial cells

Miyuki Sato, Keiko Saegusa, Katsuya Sato, Taichi Hara, Akihiro Harada, Ken Sato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

It is generally accepted that soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors mediate the docking and fusion of transport intermediates with target membranes. Our research identifies Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of synaptosomal-associated protein 29 (SNAP-29) as an essential regulator of membrane trafficking in polarized intestinal cells of living animals. We show that a depletion of SNAP-29 blocks yolk secretion and targeting of apical and basolateral plasma membrane proteins in the intestinal cells and results in a strong accumulation of small cargo-containing vesicles. The loss of SNAP-29 also blocks the transport of yolk receptor RME-2 to the plasma membrane in nonpolarized oocytes, indicating that its function is required in various cell types. SNAP-29 is essential for embryogenesis, animal growth, and viability. Functional fluorescent protein-tagged SNAP-29 mainly localizes to the plasma membrane and the late Golgi, although it also partially colocalizes with endosomal proteins. The loss of SNAP-29 leads to the vesiculation/fragmentation of the Golgi and endosomes, suggesting that SNAP-29 is involved in multiple transport pathways between the exocytic and endocytic organelles. These observations also suggest that organelles comprising the endomembrane system are highly dynamic structures based on the balance between membrane budding and fusion and that SNAP-29-mediated fusion is required to maintain proper organellar morphology and functions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2579-2587
Number of pages9
JournalMolecular Biology of the Cell
Volume22
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jul 15
Externally publishedYes

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Exocytosis
Caenorhabditis elegans
Epithelial Cells
Proteins
Cell Membrane
Organelles
SNARE Proteins
Membrane Fusion
Membranes
Endosomes
Oocytes
Embryonic Development
Blood Proteins
Membrane Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Caenorhabditis elegans SNAP-29 is required for organellar integrity of the endomembrane system and general exocytosis in intestinal epithelial cells. / Sato, Miyuki; Saegusa, Keiko; Sato, Katsuya; Hara, Taichi; Harada, Akihiro; Sato, Ken.

In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, Vol. 22, No. 14, 15.07.2011, p. 2579-2587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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