Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment

Nozomi Shionoiri, Osamu Nogariya, Masayoshi Tanaka, Tadashi Matsunaga, Tsuyoshi Tanaka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pathogenic viral infections are an international public health concern, and viral disinfection has received increasing attention. Electrochemical treatment has been used for treatment of water contaminated by bacteria for several decades, and although in recent years several reports have investigated viral inactivation kinetics, the mode of action of viral inactivation by electrochemical treatment remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated the inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for human noroviruses, by electrochemical treatment in a developed flow-cell equipped with a screen-printed electrode. The viral infectivity titer was reduced by over 5 orders of magnitude after 15 min of treatment at 0.9V vs. Ag/AgCl. Proteomic study of electrochemically inactivated virus revealed oxidation of peptides located in the viral particles; oxidation was not observed in the non-treated sample. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed that viral particles in the treated sample had irregular structures. These results suggest that electrochemical treatment inactivates FCV via oxidation of peptides in the structural region, causing structural deformation of virus particles. This first report of viral protein damage through electrochemical treatment will contribute to broadening the understanding of viral inactivation mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-415
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
Volume283
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Feline Calicivirus
Virus Inactivation
Capsid Proteins
Virion
Proteins
Viruses
oxidation
peptide
Oxidation
Peptides
protein
Norovirus
virus particle
proteomics
Water Purification
infectivity
Disinfection
Viral Proteins
Public health
Virus Diseases

Keywords

  • Electrochemical inactivation
  • Feline calicivirus
  • Mass spectrometry
  • Norovirus
  • Water treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Medicine(all)
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment. / Shionoiri, Nozomi; Nogariya, Osamu; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi.

In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Vol. 283, 01.01.2015, p. 410-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shionoiri, Nozomi ; Nogariya, Osamu ; Tanaka, Masayoshi ; Matsunaga, Tadashi ; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi. / Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment. In: Journal of Hazardous Materials. 2015 ; Vol. 283. pp. 410-415.
@article{ae87353f19ed4dba8d317d0012afafcc,
title = "Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment",
abstract = "Pathogenic viral infections are an international public health concern, and viral disinfection has received increasing attention. Electrochemical treatment has been used for treatment of water contaminated by bacteria for several decades, and although in recent years several reports have investigated viral inactivation kinetics, the mode of action of viral inactivation by electrochemical treatment remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated the inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for human noroviruses, by electrochemical treatment in a developed flow-cell equipped with a screen-printed electrode. The viral infectivity titer was reduced by over 5 orders of magnitude after 15 min of treatment at 0.9V vs. Ag/AgCl. Proteomic study of electrochemically inactivated virus revealed oxidation of peptides located in the viral particles; oxidation was not observed in the non-treated sample. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed that viral particles in the treated sample had irregular structures. These results suggest that electrochemical treatment inactivates FCV via oxidation of peptides in the structural region, causing structural deformation of virus particles. This first report of viral protein damage through electrochemical treatment will contribute to broadening the understanding of viral inactivation mechanisms.",
keywords = "Electrochemical inactivation, Feline calicivirus, Mass spectrometry, Norovirus, Water treatment",
author = "Nozomi Shionoiri and Osamu Nogariya and Masayoshi Tanaka and Tadashi Matsunaga and Tsuyoshi Tanaka",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jhazmat.2014.09.049",
language = "English",
volume = "283",
pages = "410--415",
journal = "Journal of Hazardous Materials",
issn = "0304-3894",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment

AU - Shionoiri, Nozomi

AU - Nogariya, Osamu

AU - Tanaka, Masayoshi

AU - Matsunaga, Tadashi

AU - Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Pathogenic viral infections are an international public health concern, and viral disinfection has received increasing attention. Electrochemical treatment has been used for treatment of water contaminated by bacteria for several decades, and although in recent years several reports have investigated viral inactivation kinetics, the mode of action of viral inactivation by electrochemical treatment remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated the inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for human noroviruses, by electrochemical treatment in a developed flow-cell equipped with a screen-printed electrode. The viral infectivity titer was reduced by over 5 orders of magnitude after 15 min of treatment at 0.9V vs. Ag/AgCl. Proteomic study of electrochemically inactivated virus revealed oxidation of peptides located in the viral particles; oxidation was not observed in the non-treated sample. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed that viral particles in the treated sample had irregular structures. These results suggest that electrochemical treatment inactivates FCV via oxidation of peptides in the structural region, causing structural deformation of virus particles. This first report of viral protein damage through electrochemical treatment will contribute to broadening the understanding of viral inactivation mechanisms.

AB - Pathogenic viral infections are an international public health concern, and viral disinfection has received increasing attention. Electrochemical treatment has been used for treatment of water contaminated by bacteria for several decades, and although in recent years several reports have investigated viral inactivation kinetics, the mode of action of viral inactivation by electrochemical treatment remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated the inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for human noroviruses, by electrochemical treatment in a developed flow-cell equipped with a screen-printed electrode. The viral infectivity titer was reduced by over 5 orders of magnitude after 15 min of treatment at 0.9V vs. Ag/AgCl. Proteomic study of electrochemically inactivated virus revealed oxidation of peptides located in the viral particles; oxidation was not observed in the non-treated sample. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed that viral particles in the treated sample had irregular structures. These results suggest that electrochemical treatment inactivates FCV via oxidation of peptides in the structural region, causing structural deformation of virus particles. This first report of viral protein damage through electrochemical treatment will contribute to broadening the understanding of viral inactivation mechanisms.

KW - Electrochemical inactivation

KW - Feline calicivirus

KW - Mass spectrometry

KW - Norovirus

KW - Water treatment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84907964805&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84907964805&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2014.09.049

DO - 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2014.09.049

M3 - Article

C2 - 25310599

AN - SCOPUS:84907964805

VL - 283

SP - 410

EP - 415

JO - Journal of Hazardous Materials

JF - Journal of Hazardous Materials

SN - 0304-3894

ER -