Cell-free mRNA translation in a microbiochemical reactor

K. Hosokawa, T. Fujii, T. Nojima, Shuichi Shoji, A. Yotsumoto, I. Endo

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A living cell is a huge network of chemical reactions in a compartmentalized microstructure. Realization of such a system using MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) technology would contribute to biological study and to development of an intelligent biochip. The authors have been focusing on protein synthesis in microreactors, because this process plays a central role in the chemical networks in living cells. This paper demonstrates that messenger RNA (mRNA)-polyuridylic acid-was translated into polypeptide-polyphenylalanine-in our primitive microreactor which was fabricated using conventional MEMS techniques: Silicon anisotropic etching and glass-silicon anodic bonding. The microreactor has a main reaction channel which is 14 millimeters long, 800 microns wide, and 20 microns deep. The amount of polyphenylalanine, which was synthesized in the channel, was determined using radioisotope assay.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationMHS 1997 - Proceedings of 1997 International Symposium on Micromechatronics and Human Science
    PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
    Pages91-95
    Number of pages5
    ISBN (Electronic)0780341716, 9780780341715
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1997 Jan 1
    Event8th International Symposium on Micromechatronics and Human Science, MHS 1997 - Nagoya, Japan
    Duration: 1997 Oct 51997 Oct 8

    Other

    Other8th International Symposium on Micromechatronics and Human Science, MHS 1997
    CountryJapan
    CityNagoya
    Period97/10/597/10/8

    Fingerprint

    ribonucleic acids
    Silicon
    microelectromechanical systems
    MEMS
    reactors
    Cells
    protein synthesis
    Poly U
    Biochips
    Anisotropic etching
    Messenger RNA
    Polypeptides
    polypeptides
    silicon
    cells
    Radioisotopes
    Chemical reactions
    Assays
    chemical reactions
    etching

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Instrumentation
    • Biomedical Engineering
    • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
    • Mechanical Engineering
    • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

    Cite this

    Hosokawa, K., Fujii, T., Nojima, T., Shoji, S., Yotsumoto, A., & Endo, I. (1997). Cell-free mRNA translation in a microbiochemical reactor. In MHS 1997 - Proceedings of 1997 International Symposium on Micromechatronics and Human Science (pp. 91-95). [768863] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/MHS.1997.768863

    Cell-free mRNA translation in a microbiochemical reactor. / Hosokawa, K.; Fujii, T.; Nojima, T.; Shoji, Shuichi; Yotsumoto, A.; Endo, I.

    MHS 1997 - Proceedings of 1997 International Symposium on Micromechatronics and Human Science. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 1997. p. 91-95 768863.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Hosokawa, K, Fujii, T, Nojima, T, Shoji, S, Yotsumoto, A & Endo, I 1997, Cell-free mRNA translation in a microbiochemical reactor. in MHS 1997 - Proceedings of 1997 International Symposium on Micromechatronics and Human Science., 768863, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 91-95, 8th International Symposium on Micromechatronics and Human Science, MHS 1997, Nagoya, Japan, 97/10/5. https://doi.org/10.1109/MHS.1997.768863
    Hosokawa K, Fujii T, Nojima T, Shoji S, Yotsumoto A, Endo I. Cell-free mRNA translation in a microbiochemical reactor. In MHS 1997 - Proceedings of 1997 International Symposium on Micromechatronics and Human Science. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 1997. p. 91-95. 768863 https://doi.org/10.1109/MHS.1997.768863
    Hosokawa, K. ; Fujii, T. ; Nojima, T. ; Shoji, Shuichi ; Yotsumoto, A. ; Endo, I. / Cell-free mRNA translation in a microbiochemical reactor. MHS 1997 - Proceedings of 1997 International Symposium on Micromechatronics and Human Science. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 1997. pp. 91-95
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