Central and direct regulation of testicular activity by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and its receptor

Takayoshi Ubuka, You Lee Son, Yasuko Tobari, Misato Narihiro, George E. Bentley, Lance J. Kriegsfeld, Kazuyoshi Tsutsui

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    31 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) was first identified in Japanese quail to be an inhibitor of gonadotropin synthesis and release. GnIH peptides have since been identified in all vertebrates, and all share an LPXRFamide (X = L or Q) motif at their C-termini. The receptor for GnIH is the G protein-coupled receptor 147 (GPR147), which inhibits cAMP signaling. Cell bodies of GnIH neurons are located in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in birds and the dorsomedial hypothalamic area (DMH) in most mammals. GnIH neurons in the PVN or DMH project to the median eminence to control anterior pituitary function via GPR147 expressed in gonadotropes. Further, GnIH inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced gonadotropin subunit gene transcription by inhibiting the adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA-dependent ERK pathway in an immortalized mouse gonadotrope cell line (LβT2 cells). GnIH neurons also project to GnRH neurons that express GPR147 in the preoptic area (POA) in birds and mammals. Accordingly, GnIH can inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release by decreasing the activity of GnRH neurons as well as by directly inhibiting pituitary gonadotrope activity. GnIH and GPR147 can thus centrally suppress testosterone secretion and spermatogenesis by acting in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnIH and GPR147 are also expressed in the testis of birds and mammals, possibly acting in an autocrine/paracrine manner to suppress testosterone secretion and spermatogenesis. GnIH expression is also regulated by melatonin, stress, and social environment in birds and mammals. Accordingly, the GnIH-GPR147 system may play a role in transducing physical and social environmental information to regulate optimal testicular activity in birds and mammals. This review discusses central and direct inhibitory effects of GnIH and GPR147 on testosterone secretion and spermatogenesis in birds and mammals.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberArticle 8
    JournalFrontiers in Endocrinology
    Volume5
    Issue numberJAN
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Gonadotropins
    Hormones
    G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
    Birds
    Mammals
    Neurons
    Spermatogenesis
    Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
    Testosterone
    Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus
    Gonadotropin Receptors
    Coturnix
    Median Eminence
    Preoptic Area
    Social Environment
    MAP Kinase Signaling System
    Peptide Hormones
    Melatonin
    Adenylyl Cyclases
    Vertebrates

    Keywords

    • Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone
    • Gonadotropins
    • GPR147
    • Melatonin
    • Social environment
    • Spermatogenesis
    • Stress
    • Testosterone

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

    Cite this

    Ubuka, T., Son, Y. L., Tobari, Y., Narihiro, M., Bentley, G. E., Kriegsfeld, L. J., & Tsutsui, K. (2014). Central and direct regulation of testicular activity by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and its receptor. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 5(JAN), [Article 8].

    Central and direct regulation of testicular activity by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and its receptor. / Ubuka, Takayoshi; Son, You Lee; Tobari, Yasuko; Narihiro, Misato; Bentley, George E.; Kriegsfeld, Lance J.; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi.

    In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, Vol. 5, No. JAN, Article 8, 2014.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Ubuka, T, Son, YL, Tobari, Y, Narihiro, M, Bentley, GE, Kriegsfeld, LJ & Tsutsui, K 2014, 'Central and direct regulation of testicular activity by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and its receptor', Frontiers in Endocrinology, vol. 5, no. JAN, Article 8.
    Ubuka T, Son YL, Tobari Y, Narihiro M, Bentley GE, Kriegsfeld LJ et al. Central and direct regulation of testicular activity by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and its receptor. Frontiers in Endocrinology. 2014;5(JAN). Article 8.
    Ubuka, Takayoshi ; Son, You Lee ; Tobari, Yasuko ; Narihiro, Misato ; Bentley, George E. ; Kriegsfeld, Lance J. ; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi. / Central and direct regulation of testicular activity by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and its receptor. In: Frontiers in Endocrinology. 2014 ; Vol. 5, No. JAN.
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