Changes in Mind-Wandering and Cognitive Fusion Through Mindfulness Group Therapy for Depression and Anxiety

Toru Takahashi, Tomoki Kikai, Fukiko Sugiyama, Issaku Kawashima, Ayaka Kuroda, Kaori Usui, Wakana Maeda, Taro Uchida, Siqing Guan, Mana Oguchi, Hiroaki Kumano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mechanisms of efficacy in mindfulness-based interventions for depression and anxiety are not fully understood. To clarify these mechanisms, we tested the hypotheses that mindwandering, daydreaming, cognitive fusion, and experiential avoidance will decrease through mindfulness group therapy, and this decrease will correlate with improvements in depression and anxiety. Participants self-reported depression and/or anxiety (N = 28) took part in an 8-week mindfulness group therapy program. They were assessed using self-report scales at pre- and post-intervention, and at 2-month follow-up. Results indicated that depression and trait-anxiety decreased between pre- and post-intervention with moderate effect sizes, which were maintained at follow-up. Mind-wandering and cognitive fusion also decreased between pre- and post-intervention with small to moderate effect sizes, and maintained at follow-up. The decreases in mind-wandering and cognitive fusion moderately correlated with improvements in depression and anxiety, suggesting that decreases in mind-wandering and cognitive fusion might underlie efficacious mechanisms of mindfulness group therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-176
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • cognitive fusion
  • depression
  • experiential avoidance
  • mind-wandering
  • mindfulness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Changes in Mind-Wandering and Cognitive Fusion Through Mindfulness Group Therapy for Depression and Anxiety'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this