Changes in muscle activation and force generation patterns during cycling movements because of low-intensity squat training with slow movement and tonic force generation

Michiya Tanimoto*, Hiroshi Arakawa, Kiyoshi Sanada, Motohiko Miyachi, Naokata Ishii

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our previous studies showed that relatively low-load (∼50-60% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]) resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation (LST) significantly increased muscle size and strength. However, LST is a very specific movement that differs from natural movements associated with sport activities and activities of daily life, and therefore, it might have some unfavorable effects on dynamic sport movement. We investigated the effects of LST on muscle activity and force generation patterns during cycling movement as a representative dynamic sports movement. Twenty-four healthy young men who were not in the habit of bicycle riding and did not have a history of regular resistance training were randomly assigned to the LST (∼-60% 1 RM load, 3-second lifting, and 3- second lowering movement without a relaxing phase: n = 8), a high-intensity exercise at normal speed (HM) group (85% 1 RM load, 1-second lifting, 1-second lowering, and 1-second relaxed movement: n = 8), or sedentary control (CON, n =8)group. Subjects in the training groups performed vertical squats by the assigned method. Exercise sessions consisted of 3 sets and were performed twice a week for 13 weeks. Pre- and posttraining muscle activation and force generation patterns during the cycling movements were evaluated by the coefficient of variation (CV) of the rectified electromyographic (EMG) wave from the vastus lateralis and CV of pedaling force. Both the CV of the rectified EMG and of pedaling force decreased significantly in the LST group (-21 and -18%, p < 0.05, respectively), whereas there were no significant changes in either the HN or the CON group. This decrease in CV in the LST group could mean that muscle activity and force generation during cycling movement have become more tonic. This result following LST may have an unfavorable effect on cycling movement and other dynamic sports movements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2367-2376
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of strength and conditioning research
Volume23
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Nov
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Continuous muscle activity
  • Muscle activity pattern
  • Resistance training method

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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