Chemical wiring and soldering toward all-molecule electronic circuitry

Yuji Okawa, Swapan K. Mandal, Chunping Hu, Yoshitaka Tateyama, Stefan Goedecker, Shigeru Tsukamoto, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, James K. Gimzewski, Masakazu Aono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Key to single-molecule electronics is connecting functional molecules to each other using conductive nanowires. This involves two issues: how to create conductive nanowires at designated positions, and how to ensure chemical bonding between the nanowires and functional molecules. Here, we present a novel method that solves both issues. Relevant functional molecules are placed on a self-assembled monolayer of diacetylene compound. A probe tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is then positioned on the molecular row of the diacetylene compound to which the functional molecule is adsorbed, and a conductive polydiacetylene nanowire is fabricated by initiating chain polymerization by stimulation with the tip. Since the front edge of chain polymerization necessarily has a reactive chemical species, the created polymer nanowire forms chemical bonding with an encountered molecular element. We name this spontaneous reaction chemical soldering. First-principles theoretical calculations are used to investigate the structures and electronic properties of the connection. We demonstrate that two conductive polymer nanowires are connected to a single phthalocyanine molecule. A resonant tunneling diode formed by this method is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8227-8233
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume133
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jun 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nanowires
Soldering
Electric wiring
Molecules
Polymerization
Polymers
Resonant tunneling diodes
Self assembled monolayers
Chemical elements
Electronic properties
Names
Chemical reactions
Microscopes
Electronic equipment
Scanning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Catalysis
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Okawa, Y., Mandal, S. K., Hu, C., Tateyama, Y., Goedecker, S., Tsukamoto, S., ... Aono, M. (2011). Chemical wiring and soldering toward all-molecule electronic circuitry. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 133(21), 8227-8233. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja111673x

Chemical wiring and soldering toward all-molecule electronic circuitry. / Okawa, Yuji; Mandal, Swapan K.; Hu, Chunping; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Goedecker, Stefan; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Gimzewski, James K.; Aono, Masakazu.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 133, No. 21, 01.06.2011, p. 8227-8233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Okawa, Y, Mandal, SK, Hu, C, Tateyama, Y, Goedecker, S, Tsukamoto, S, Hasegawa, T, Gimzewski, JK & Aono, M 2011, 'Chemical wiring and soldering toward all-molecule electronic circuitry', Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 133, no. 21, pp. 8227-8233. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja111673x
Okawa Y, Mandal SK, Hu C, Tateyama Y, Goedecker S, Tsukamoto S et al. Chemical wiring and soldering toward all-molecule electronic circuitry. Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2011 Jun 1;133(21):8227-8233. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja111673x
Okawa, Yuji ; Mandal, Swapan K. ; Hu, Chunping ; Tateyama, Yoshitaka ; Goedecker, Stefan ; Tsukamoto, Shigeru ; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi ; Gimzewski, James K. ; Aono, Masakazu. / Chemical wiring and soldering toward all-molecule electronic circuitry. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society. 2011 ; Vol. 133, No. 21. pp. 8227-8233.
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