Cognitive function and dynamic cerebral blood flow regulation in multiple concussions

Akira Kumazaki, Shigehiko Ogoh, Ai Hirasawa, Sadayoshi Sakai, Norikazu Hirose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Concussion causes acute, short-term brain dysfunctions. However, the impact of repetitive concussion history on brain function remains unclear. Objectives: The present study examined the effect of a history of multiple concussions on the cognitive functions and dynamic cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation in collegiate rugby football players. Methods: Nine male rugby football players with a history of≤1 concussion and nine players with a history of multiple concussions (≤ 4 concussions) participated in this study. Reaction time and working memory were assessed using a neurocognitive assessment device (CogSport; CogState Ltd., Melbourne, Australia). Arterial blood pressure and middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv) were measured continuously throughout the experiment. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was examined using a thigh-cuff occlusion and release technique. Results:We found a significant difference in the short-term working memory between players with a history of ≤1 concussion and those with a history of multiple concussions (P < 0.05). However, dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusions: We found a dysfunction in the short-term memory function of collegiate rugby football players with a history of multiple concussions. However, this impairment in brain function was not associated with changes in dynamic CBF regulation.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere67660
JournalAsian Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Mar 1

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
Football
Cognition
Short-Term Memory
Brain
Homeostasis
History
Middle Cerebral Artery
Thigh
Reaction Time
Arterial Pressure
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Cerebral blood flow
  • Cognition
  • Collision sports
  • Head impact
  • Neuropsychological test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Cognitive function and dynamic cerebral blood flow regulation in multiple concussions. / Kumazaki, Akira; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Hirasawa, Ai; Sakai, Sadayoshi; Hirose, Norikazu.

In: Asian Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 1, e67660, 01.03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kumazaki, Akira ; Ogoh, Shigehiko ; Hirasawa, Ai ; Sakai, Sadayoshi ; Hirose, Norikazu. / Cognitive function and dynamic cerebral blood flow regulation in multiple concussions. In: Asian Journal of Sports Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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