Comparison of age-related, site-specific muscle loss between young and old active and inactive Japanese women

Takashi Abe, Yasuo Kawakami, Michael G. Bemben, Tetsuo Fukunaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the effect of habitual recreational sports and exercise activity on age-related, site-specific muscle loss in young and old women in Japan. Methods: Participants included 152 young (aged 20-35 years) and 157 old (aged 60-85 years) women who were classified into 4 subgroups on the basis of their habitual (more than once a week) sports and exercise activity: young active (n = 86), young inactive (n = 66), old active (n = 43), and old inactive (n = 114). Muscle thickness (MTH) and fat thickness (FTH) were measured by ultrasonography at 8 sites, with MTH expressed in terms relative to limb length (MTH/L) or height (MTH/Ht). Percent fat was estimated from FTH, and fat-free mass was calculated. Results: Fat-free mass was similar between younger and older women and between active and inactive women. MTH/L in the quadriceps (P <.001), abdomen (P <.001), and triceps surae (P <.05) was lower in the older women than in the younger women. In contrast, MTH/L in the hamstrings, subscapula, and biceps was higher (P <.01) in the older women than in the younger women. Compared with the MTH of the young inactive women, the MTH of the young active women was greater (P <.05) in 5 sites. Similarly, MTH/L in the quadriceps and triceps was higher (P <.05) in the old active women than in the old inactive women. However, quadriceps MTH/L and abdomen MTH/Ht were still lower (P <.001) in the old active women than in the young inactive women. Conclusion: Age-related muscle loss remains site-specific in both active and inactive young and old women, even when habitual physical activity has an effect on muscle size.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168-173
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Geriatric Physical Therapy
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Oct

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Muscles
Fats
Exercise
Abdomen
Sports
Quadriceps Muscle
Ultrasonography
Japan
Extremities

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Muscle thickness
  • Sarcopenia
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Comparison of age-related, site-specific muscle loss between young and old active and inactive Japanese women. / Abe, Takashi; Kawakami, Yasuo; Bemben, Michael G.; Fukunaga, Tetsuo.

In: Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, Vol. 34, No. 4, 10.2011, p. 168-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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