Comparison of different sources and degrees of hydrolysis of dietary protein: Effect on plasma amino acids, dipeptides, and insulin responses in human subjects

Masashi Morifuji, Mihoko Ishizaka, Seigo Baba, Kumiko Fukuda, Hitoshi Matsumoto, Jinichiro Koga, Minoru Kanegae, Mitsuru Higuchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of protein fractionation on the bioavailability of amino acids and peptides and insulin response and whether the protein source influences these effects in humans are poorly understood. This study compared the effects of different sources and degrees of hydrolysis of dietary protein, independent of carbohydrate, on plasma amino acid and dipeptide levels and insulin responses in humans. Ten subjects were enrolled in the study, with five subjects participating in trials on either soy or whey protein and their hydrolysates. Protein hydrolysates were absorbed more rapidly as plasma amino acids compared to nonhydrolyzed protein. Whey protein also caused more rapid increases in indispensable amino acid and branched-chain amino acid concentrations than soy protein. In addition, protein hydrolysates caused significant increases in Val-Leu and Ile-Leu concentrations compared to nonhydrolyzed protein. Whey protein hydrolysates also induced significantly greater stimulation of insulin release than the other proteins. Taken together, these results demonstrate whey protein hydrolysates cause significantly greater increases in the plasma concentrations of amino acids, dipeptides, and insulin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)8788-8797
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume58
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Aug 11

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Protein Hydrolysates
dipeptides
Dietary Proteins
Dipeptides
dietary protein
protein hydrolysates
Hydrolysis
whey protein
insulin
hydrolysis
Insulin
Plasmas
Amino Acids
amino acids
Soybean Proteins
Proteins
soy protein
valylleucine
proteins
Branched Chain Amino Acids

Keywords

  • insulin response
  • plasma amino acids
  • plasma peptides
  • Whey protein hydrolysates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Comparison of different sources and degrees of hydrolysis of dietary protein : Effect on plasma amino acids, dipeptides, and insulin responses in human subjects. / Morifuji, Masashi; Ishizaka, Mihoko; Baba, Seigo; Fukuda, Kumiko; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Higuchi, Mitsuru.

In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Vol. 58, No. 15, 11.08.2010, p. 8788-8797.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morifuji, Masashi ; Ishizaka, Mihoko ; Baba, Seigo ; Fukuda, Kumiko ; Matsumoto, Hitoshi ; Koga, Jinichiro ; Kanegae, Minoru ; Higuchi, Mitsuru. / Comparison of different sources and degrees of hydrolysis of dietary protein : Effect on plasma amino acids, dipeptides, and insulin responses in human subjects. In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 2010 ; Vol. 58, No. 15. pp. 8788-8797.
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