Comparison of skeletal muscle mass to fat-free mass ratios among different ethnic groups

T. Abe, M. G. Bemben, M. Kondo, Yasuo Kawakami, T. Fukunaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Asians seem to have less skeletal muscle mass (SMM) than other ethnic groups, but it is not clear whether relative SMM, i.e., SMM/height square or SMM to fat-free mass (FFM) ratio, differs among different ethnic groups at the same level of body mass index (BMI). Objective: To compare the SMM to fat-free mass (FFM) ratio as well as anthropometric variables and body composition among 3 ethnic groups. Design, setting, and participants: Three hundred thirty-nine Japanese, 343 Brazilian, and 183 German men and women were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Measurements: Muscle thickness (MTH) and subcutaneous fat thickness (FTH) were measured by ultrasound at nine sites on the anterior and posterior aspects of the body. FTH was used to estimate the body density, from which fat mass and fat-free mass (FFM) was calculated by using Brozek equation. Total SMM was estimated from ultrasound-derived prediction equations. Results: Percentage body fat was similar among the ethnic groups in men, while Brazilians were higher than Japanese in women. In German men and women, absolute SMM and FFM were higher than in their Japanese and Brazilians counterparts. SMM index and SMM:FFM ratios were similar among the ethnic groups in women, excluding SMM:FFM ratio in Brazilian. In men, however, these relative values (SMM index and SMM:FFM ratio) were still higher in Germans. After adjusting for age and BMI, the SMM index and SMM:FFM ratios were lower in Brazilian men and women compared with the other two ethnic groups, while the SMM index and SMM:FFM ratios were similar in Japanese and German men and women, excluding SMM:FFM ratio in women. Conclusion: Our results suggest that relative SMM is not lower in Asian populations compared with European populations after adjusted by age and BMI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)534-538
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Ethnic Groups
Skeletal Muscle
Fats
Body Mass Index
Subcutaneous Fat
Body Composition
Population

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Body mass index
  • Muscle thickness
  • Racial differences
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Comparison of skeletal muscle mass to fat-free mass ratios among different ethnic groups. / Abe, T.; Bemben, M. G.; Kondo, M.; Kawakami, Yasuo; Fukunaga, T.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, Vol. 16, No. 6, 2012, p. 534-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abe, T. ; Bemben, M. G. ; Kondo, M. ; Kawakami, Yasuo ; Fukunaga, T. / Comparison of skeletal muscle mass to fat-free mass ratios among different ethnic groups. In: Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging. 2012 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 534-538.
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