Competitiveness in sports activities of the psychiatrically disabled

Sunao Uchida, Takashi Takahata, Shinichi Miyazaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 2002, psychiatrically disabled athletes joined an historic first open game of volleyball at the national sports games for the disabled. Compared to the competitive sports and Paralympic Games that physically and intellectually disabled athletes have participated in, activities for the psychiatrically disabled have not been well-organized. In this paper, we examine a number of problems that have arisen when the psychiatrically disabled joined competitive sports games. We identify two major characteristics of the psychiatrically disabled of particular relevance when organizing competitive sports activities. First, all psychiatrically disabled athletes need treatment of their individual diseases. For example, psychiatric symptoms fluctuate markedly over time, unlike physical or intellectual disabilities, whose symptoms are much more stable. Exacerbations of psychiatric illness are also likely to occur due to the stresses of competitiveness. Second, psychiatric disabilities are manifestations of disorders in the central nervous system, which makes the classification of psychiatric disabilities less straightforward than classification of the physically disabled. These two characteristics require special attention when organizing competitive athletic challenges that include the psychiatrically disabled. However, promoting sports activities that include the psychiatrically disabled would be expected to reduce the prejudice toward and subsequent social disadvantages experienced by psychiatric patients. Thus, with careful planning to successfully integrate psychiatrically disabled athletes, we expect increased promotion of such sports activities in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1242-1248
Number of pages7
JournalSeishin shinkeigaku zasshi = Psychiatria et neurologia Japonica
Volume104
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sports
Psychiatry
Athletes
Disabled Persons
Sports for Persons with Disabilities
Volleyball
Central Nervous System Diseases
Intellectual Disability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Competitiveness in sports activities of the psychiatrically disabled. / Uchida, Sunao; Takahata, Takashi; Miyazaki, Shinichi.

In: Seishin shinkeigaku zasshi = Psychiatria et neurologia Japonica, Vol. 104, No. 12, 2002, p. 1242-1248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Uchida, Sunao ; Takahata, Takashi ; Miyazaki, Shinichi. / Competitiveness in sports activities of the psychiatrically disabled. In: Seishin shinkeigaku zasshi = Psychiatria et neurologia Japonica. 2002 ; Vol. 104, No. 12. pp. 1242-1248.
@article{8b8638a1285644f7ba1b8bef43026e75,
title = "Competitiveness in sports activities of the psychiatrically disabled",
abstract = "In 2002, psychiatrically disabled athletes joined an historic first open game of volleyball at the national sports games for the disabled. Compared to the competitive sports and Paralympic Games that physically and intellectually disabled athletes have participated in, activities for the psychiatrically disabled have not been well-organized. In this paper, we examine a number of problems that have arisen when the psychiatrically disabled joined competitive sports games. We identify two major characteristics of the psychiatrically disabled of particular relevance when organizing competitive sports activities. First, all psychiatrically disabled athletes need treatment of their individual diseases. For example, psychiatric symptoms fluctuate markedly over time, unlike physical or intellectual disabilities, whose symptoms are much more stable. Exacerbations of psychiatric illness are also likely to occur due to the stresses of competitiveness. Second, psychiatric disabilities are manifestations of disorders in the central nervous system, which makes the classification of psychiatric disabilities less straightforward than classification of the physically disabled. These two characteristics require special attention when organizing competitive athletic challenges that include the psychiatrically disabled. However, promoting sports activities that include the psychiatrically disabled would be expected to reduce the prejudice toward and subsequent social disadvantages experienced by psychiatric patients. Thus, with careful planning to successfully integrate psychiatrically disabled athletes, we expect increased promotion of such sports activities in the future.",
author = "Sunao Uchida and Takashi Takahata and Shinichi Miyazaki",
year = "2002",
language = "English",
volume = "104",
pages = "1242--1248",
journal = "Psychiatria et Neurologia Japonica - Seishin Shinkeigaku Zasshi",
issn = "0033-2658",
publisher = "Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Competitiveness in sports activities of the psychiatrically disabled

AU - Uchida, Sunao

AU - Takahata, Takashi

AU - Miyazaki, Shinichi

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - In 2002, psychiatrically disabled athletes joined an historic first open game of volleyball at the national sports games for the disabled. Compared to the competitive sports and Paralympic Games that physically and intellectually disabled athletes have participated in, activities for the psychiatrically disabled have not been well-organized. In this paper, we examine a number of problems that have arisen when the psychiatrically disabled joined competitive sports games. We identify two major characteristics of the psychiatrically disabled of particular relevance when organizing competitive sports activities. First, all psychiatrically disabled athletes need treatment of their individual diseases. For example, psychiatric symptoms fluctuate markedly over time, unlike physical or intellectual disabilities, whose symptoms are much more stable. Exacerbations of psychiatric illness are also likely to occur due to the stresses of competitiveness. Second, psychiatric disabilities are manifestations of disorders in the central nervous system, which makes the classification of psychiatric disabilities less straightforward than classification of the physically disabled. These two characteristics require special attention when organizing competitive athletic challenges that include the psychiatrically disabled. However, promoting sports activities that include the psychiatrically disabled would be expected to reduce the prejudice toward and subsequent social disadvantages experienced by psychiatric patients. Thus, with careful planning to successfully integrate psychiatrically disabled athletes, we expect increased promotion of such sports activities in the future.

AB - In 2002, psychiatrically disabled athletes joined an historic first open game of volleyball at the national sports games for the disabled. Compared to the competitive sports and Paralympic Games that physically and intellectually disabled athletes have participated in, activities for the psychiatrically disabled have not been well-organized. In this paper, we examine a number of problems that have arisen when the psychiatrically disabled joined competitive sports games. We identify two major characteristics of the psychiatrically disabled of particular relevance when organizing competitive sports activities. First, all psychiatrically disabled athletes need treatment of their individual diseases. For example, psychiatric symptoms fluctuate markedly over time, unlike physical or intellectual disabilities, whose symptoms are much more stable. Exacerbations of psychiatric illness are also likely to occur due to the stresses of competitiveness. Second, psychiatric disabilities are manifestations of disorders in the central nervous system, which makes the classification of psychiatric disabilities less straightforward than classification of the physically disabled. These two characteristics require special attention when organizing competitive athletic challenges that include the psychiatrically disabled. However, promoting sports activities that include the psychiatrically disabled would be expected to reduce the prejudice toward and subsequent social disadvantages experienced by psychiatric patients. Thus, with careful planning to successfully integrate psychiatrically disabled athletes, we expect increased promotion of such sports activities in the future.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0038321907&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0038321907&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12649894

AN - SCOPUS:0038321907

VL - 104

SP - 1242

EP - 1248

JO - Psychiatria et Neurologia Japonica - Seishin Shinkeigaku Zasshi

JF - Psychiatria et Neurologia Japonica - Seishin Shinkeigaku Zasshi

SN - 0033-2658

IS - 12

ER -