Controlling access time to a high-fat diet during the inactive period protects against obesity in mice

Atsushi Haraguchi, Natsumi Aoki, Teiji Ohtsu, Yuko Ikeda, Yu Tahara, Shigenobu Shibata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Free feeding (FF) with a high fat diet (HFD) causes excessive body weight gain, whereas restricted feeding (RF) with a HFD attenuates body weight gain. The effects of timing of feeding with a HFD (day vs. night) and feeding duration on energy homeostasis have not yet been investigated. In this study, we fed mice a HFD or a normal diet (ND) twice a day, during their active and inactive periods, on a schedule. The amount of food was regulated by feeding duration (2, 4 or 8h). First, we investigated the effects of 4-h RF during active-inactive periods (ND-ND, HFD-HFD, ND-HFD or HFD-ND). Among all the 4-h RF groups, mice consumed almost the same amount of calories as those in the FF[ND] group, even those fed a HFD. Body weight and visceral fat in these three groups were lower than that in the FF[HFD] group. Second, we investigated the effects of RF duration. Body weight and visceral fat were higher in the 8-h groups than in the 4-h groups. Body weight and visceral fat were higher in the 2-h groups than in the 4-h groups even though the 2-h groups had less food. Third, we investigated the effects of eating a HFD during the inactive period, when RF duration was extended (2, 6 or 12h). Mice were fed with a HFD during the inactive period for 2h and fed with a ND during the active period for 2, 6 or 12h. Body weight and visceral fat in these mice were comparable to those in the FF[ND] mice. The results of our first set of experiments suggest that 4-h RF was an adequate feeding duration to control the effect of a HFD on obesity. The results of our second set of experiments suggest 2-h RF (such as speed-eating) and 8-h RF, representative of eating disorders, are unhealthy feeding patterns related to obesity. The results of our third set of experiments suggest that eating a HFD for a short period during the night does not affect body weight and visceral fat. Taken together, these results indicate that consideration to feeding with a HFD during the inactive period and restricting eating habits relieve the risks of body weight gain and visceral fat accumulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)935-944
Number of pages10
JournalChronobiology International
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Oct 1

Fingerprint

High Fat Diet
Obesity
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Body Weight
Diet
Weight Gain
Eating
Feeding Behavior
Food
Appointments and Schedules

Keywords

  • Circadian rhythm
  • High fat diet
  • Liver
  • Night eating
  • Period
  • Phase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Controlling access time to a high-fat diet during the inactive period protects against obesity in mice. / Haraguchi, Atsushi; Aoki, Natsumi; Ohtsu, Teiji; Ikeda, Yuko; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu.

In: Chronobiology International, Vol. 31, No. 8, 01.10.2014, p. 935-944.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{740cda2f03b04ea2909c95e256e8f0b2,
title = "Controlling access time to a high-fat diet during the inactive period protects against obesity in mice",
abstract = "Free feeding (FF) with a high fat diet (HFD) causes excessive body weight gain, whereas restricted feeding (RF) with a HFD attenuates body weight gain. The effects of timing of feeding with a HFD (day vs. night) and feeding duration on energy homeostasis have not yet been investigated. In this study, we fed mice a HFD or a normal diet (ND) twice a day, during their active and inactive periods, on a schedule. The amount of food was regulated by feeding duration (2, 4 or 8h). First, we investigated the effects of 4-h RF during active-inactive periods (ND-ND, HFD-HFD, ND-HFD or HFD-ND). Among all the 4-h RF groups, mice consumed almost the same amount of calories as those in the FF[ND] group, even those fed a HFD. Body weight and visceral fat in these three groups were lower than that in the FF[HFD] group. Second, we investigated the effects of RF duration. Body weight and visceral fat were higher in the 8-h groups than in the 4-h groups. Body weight and visceral fat were higher in the 2-h groups than in the 4-h groups even though the 2-h groups had less food. Third, we investigated the effects of eating a HFD during the inactive period, when RF duration was extended (2, 6 or 12h). Mice were fed with a HFD during the inactive period for 2h and fed with a ND during the active period for 2, 6 or 12h. Body weight and visceral fat in these mice were comparable to those in the FF[ND] mice. The results of our first set of experiments suggest that 4-h RF was an adequate feeding duration to control the effect of a HFD on obesity. The results of our second set of experiments suggest 2-h RF (such as speed-eating) and 8-h RF, representative of eating disorders, are unhealthy feeding patterns related to obesity. The results of our third set of experiments suggest that eating a HFD for a short period during the night does not affect body weight and visceral fat. Taken together, these results indicate that consideration to feeding with a HFD during the inactive period and restricting eating habits relieve the risks of body weight gain and visceral fat accumulation.",
keywords = "Circadian rhythm, High fat diet, Liver, Night eating, Period, Phase",
author = "Atsushi Haraguchi and Natsumi Aoki and Teiji Ohtsu and Yuko Ikeda and Yu Tahara and Shigenobu Shibata",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3109/07420528.2014.931413",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "935--944",
journal = "Annual Review of Chronopharmacology",
issn = "0743-9539",
publisher = "Marcel Dekker Inc.",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Controlling access time to a high-fat diet during the inactive period protects against obesity in mice

AU - Haraguchi, Atsushi

AU - Aoki, Natsumi

AU - Ohtsu, Teiji

AU - Ikeda, Yuko

AU - Tahara, Yu

AU - Shibata, Shigenobu

PY - 2014/10/1

Y1 - 2014/10/1

N2 - Free feeding (FF) with a high fat diet (HFD) causes excessive body weight gain, whereas restricted feeding (RF) with a HFD attenuates body weight gain. The effects of timing of feeding with a HFD (day vs. night) and feeding duration on energy homeostasis have not yet been investigated. In this study, we fed mice a HFD or a normal diet (ND) twice a day, during their active and inactive periods, on a schedule. The amount of food was regulated by feeding duration (2, 4 or 8h). First, we investigated the effects of 4-h RF during active-inactive periods (ND-ND, HFD-HFD, ND-HFD or HFD-ND). Among all the 4-h RF groups, mice consumed almost the same amount of calories as those in the FF[ND] group, even those fed a HFD. Body weight and visceral fat in these three groups were lower than that in the FF[HFD] group. Second, we investigated the effects of RF duration. Body weight and visceral fat were higher in the 8-h groups than in the 4-h groups. Body weight and visceral fat were higher in the 2-h groups than in the 4-h groups even though the 2-h groups had less food. Third, we investigated the effects of eating a HFD during the inactive period, when RF duration was extended (2, 6 or 12h). Mice were fed with a HFD during the inactive period for 2h and fed with a ND during the active period for 2, 6 or 12h. Body weight and visceral fat in these mice were comparable to those in the FF[ND] mice. The results of our first set of experiments suggest that 4-h RF was an adequate feeding duration to control the effect of a HFD on obesity. The results of our second set of experiments suggest 2-h RF (such as speed-eating) and 8-h RF, representative of eating disorders, are unhealthy feeding patterns related to obesity. The results of our third set of experiments suggest that eating a HFD for a short period during the night does not affect body weight and visceral fat. Taken together, these results indicate that consideration to feeding with a HFD during the inactive period and restricting eating habits relieve the risks of body weight gain and visceral fat accumulation.

AB - Free feeding (FF) with a high fat diet (HFD) causes excessive body weight gain, whereas restricted feeding (RF) with a HFD attenuates body weight gain. The effects of timing of feeding with a HFD (day vs. night) and feeding duration on energy homeostasis have not yet been investigated. In this study, we fed mice a HFD or a normal diet (ND) twice a day, during their active and inactive periods, on a schedule. The amount of food was regulated by feeding duration (2, 4 or 8h). First, we investigated the effects of 4-h RF during active-inactive periods (ND-ND, HFD-HFD, ND-HFD or HFD-ND). Among all the 4-h RF groups, mice consumed almost the same amount of calories as those in the FF[ND] group, even those fed a HFD. Body weight and visceral fat in these three groups were lower than that in the FF[HFD] group. Second, we investigated the effects of RF duration. Body weight and visceral fat were higher in the 8-h groups than in the 4-h groups. Body weight and visceral fat were higher in the 2-h groups than in the 4-h groups even though the 2-h groups had less food. Third, we investigated the effects of eating a HFD during the inactive period, when RF duration was extended (2, 6 or 12h). Mice were fed with a HFD during the inactive period for 2h and fed with a ND during the active period for 2, 6 or 12h. Body weight and visceral fat in these mice were comparable to those in the FF[ND] mice. The results of our first set of experiments suggest that 4-h RF was an adequate feeding duration to control the effect of a HFD on obesity. The results of our second set of experiments suggest 2-h RF (such as speed-eating) and 8-h RF, representative of eating disorders, are unhealthy feeding patterns related to obesity. The results of our third set of experiments suggest that eating a HFD for a short period during the night does not affect body weight and visceral fat. Taken together, these results indicate that consideration to feeding with a HFD during the inactive period and restricting eating habits relieve the risks of body weight gain and visceral fat accumulation.

KW - Circadian rhythm

KW - High fat diet

KW - Liver

KW - Night eating

KW - Period

KW - Phase

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84907043492&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84907043492&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/07420528.2014.931413

DO - 10.3109/07420528.2014.931413

M3 - Article

C2 - 24984029

AN - SCOPUS:84907043492

VL - 31

SP - 935

EP - 944

JO - Annual Review of Chronopharmacology

JF - Annual Review of Chronopharmacology

SN - 0743-9539

IS - 8

ER -