CT imaging of diffuse medium by time-resolved measurement of backscattered light

Takeshi Namita, Yuji Kato, Koichi Shimizu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Backscattered light was used to reconstruct cross-sectional images of absorption distributions in diffuse media. For efficient and accurate reconstruction, the inverse problem was solved for one dimension, thereby yielding the absorption distribution in a depth direction. A cross-sectional image or three-dimensional structure is reconstructed by shifting a source-detector pair along the object surface. The object is divided into imaginary layers to solve the inverse problem. This solution's accuracy is further improved by solving the problem for two groups of layers successively instead of solving for all layers simultaneously. The technique's effectiveness was verified using solid phantoms and biological tissues.

Original languageEnglish
JournalApplied Optics
Volume48
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Apr 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Time measurement
Inverse problems
time measurement
Imaging techniques
Tissue
Detectors
detectors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

CT imaging of diffuse medium by time-resolved measurement of backscattered light. / Namita, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi.

In: Applied Optics, Vol. 48, No. 10, 01.04.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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