Cultivating tipping points: Network science in teaching

Catherine Cramer, Ralucca Gera, Michaela Labriole, Hiroki Sayama, Lori Sheetz, Emma Towlson, Stephen Uzzo

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Current education systems continue to be based predominantly on reduc-tionist mindsets in which teaching is conducted on a subject-by-subject and module-by-module basis. Improvement is planned and implemented using a linear, causal, independent-problem-to-solution approach, with very little consideration given to the interconnectedness among the various components and ideas involved in these complex knowledge systems. This situation presents a need to think about how understanding these connections can improve the learning of complex ideas. It also constitutes an opportunity to provide a multifaceted intervention for communities of learners, which would, itself, be a coordinated network of collaborative efforts to develop a network literate populace. In this paper, the authors describe addressing these issues through a multi-phase, multi-year approach to professional development with formal and informal educators; the outcomes of this work; and next steps.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-183
Number of pages9
JournalSpringer Proceedings in Complexity
Issue number219279
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes
Event9th International Conference on Complex Networks, CompleNet 2018 - Boston, United States
Duration: 2018 Mar 52018 Mar 8

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Teaching
Education
Professional Development
Module
Continue
Knowledge
Learning
Community

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Modelling and Simulation
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Cramer, C., Gera, R., Labriole, M., Sayama, H., Sheetz, L., Towlson, E., & Uzzo, S. (2018). Cultivating tipping points: Network science in teaching. Springer Proceedings in Complexity, (219279), 175-183. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-73198-8_15

Cultivating tipping points : Network science in teaching. / Cramer, Catherine; Gera, Ralucca; Labriole, Michaela; Sayama, Hiroki; Sheetz, Lori; Towlson, Emma; Uzzo, Stephen.

In: Springer Proceedings in Complexity, No. 219279, 01.01.2018, p. 175-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Cramer, C, Gera, R, Labriole, M, Sayama, H, Sheetz, L, Towlson, E & Uzzo, S 2018, 'Cultivating tipping points: Network science in teaching', Springer Proceedings in Complexity, no. 219279, pp. 175-183. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-73198-8_15
Cramer, Catherine ; Gera, Ralucca ; Labriole, Michaela ; Sayama, Hiroki ; Sheetz, Lori ; Towlson, Emma ; Uzzo, Stephen. / Cultivating tipping points : Network science in teaching. In: Springer Proceedings in Complexity. 2018 ; No. 219279. pp. 175-183.
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