Cultural transmission in robotic swarms through RFID cards

Josh Brandoff, Hiroki Sayama

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The recent development of economical highcapacity RFID cards has opened up a new opportunity for stigmergic robotic swarms. Through these cards, robotic agents can dynamically exchange more complex, logical information, such as the whole set of their behavioral rules or "culture". To the best of our knowledge, this opportunity has not been explored in swarm robotics and other collective robotics communities. We have developed a prototypical robotic swarm system comprised of 8 low-cost OPEN-ROBOTs with the ability to avoid obstacles and exchange information with low-capacity RFID cards randomly distributed in an environment. To evaluate the effectiveness of our RFID-based cultural transmission technique, we created a realistic computer simulation to test the swarm's competence in mapping a virtual multi-room house covered with 80 low-capacity RFID cards in under one hour. By increasing the probability that a robot adopts a random exploration behavior different from one "marked" on a card, the swarm is able to cover more of an environment with higher consistency between trials. This result indicates that encouraging diversity among agents supports robust emergent behavior and lays the groundwork for future experiments with higher-capacity RFID cards.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2009 IEEE Symposium on Artificial Life, ALIFE 2009 - Proceedings
Pages171-178
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event2009 IEEE Symposium on Artificial Life, ALIFE 2009 - Nashville, TN, United States
Duration: 2009 Mar 302009 Apr 2

Other

Other2009 IEEE Symposium on Artificial Life, ALIFE 2009
CountryUnited States
CityNashville, TN
Period09/3/3009/4/2

Fingerprint

Radio Frequency Identification Device
Robotics
Radio frequency identification (RFID)
Aptitude
Computer Simulation
Mental Competency
Robots
Costs and Cost Analysis
Computer simulation
Costs
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

Cite this

Brandoff, J., & Sayama, H. (2009). Cultural transmission in robotic swarms through RFID cards. In 2009 IEEE Symposium on Artificial Life, ALIFE 2009 - Proceedings (pp. 171-178). [4937709] https://doi.org/10.1109/ALIFE.2009.4937709

Cultural transmission in robotic swarms through RFID cards. / Brandoff, Josh; Sayama, Hiroki.

2009 IEEE Symposium on Artificial Life, ALIFE 2009 - Proceedings. 2009. p. 171-178 4937709.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Brandoff, J & Sayama, H 2009, Cultural transmission in robotic swarms through RFID cards. in 2009 IEEE Symposium on Artificial Life, ALIFE 2009 - Proceedings., 4937709, pp. 171-178, 2009 IEEE Symposium on Artificial Life, ALIFE 2009, Nashville, TN, United States, 09/3/30. https://doi.org/10.1109/ALIFE.2009.4937709
Brandoff J, Sayama H. Cultural transmission in robotic swarms through RFID cards. In 2009 IEEE Symposium on Artificial Life, ALIFE 2009 - Proceedings. 2009. p. 171-178. 4937709 https://doi.org/10.1109/ALIFE.2009.4937709
Brandoff, Josh ; Sayama, Hiroki. / Cultural transmission in robotic swarms through RFID cards. 2009 IEEE Symposium on Artificial Life, ALIFE 2009 - Proceedings. 2009. pp. 171-178
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