Design of a wearable device for low frequency haptic stimulation

Jerome Amiguet, Salvatore Sessa, Hannes Bleuler, Atsuo Takanishi

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Haptic devices has been an expanding field in recent years. Most existing wearable haptic devices focus on delivering vibrations, and can generally be used only on one body part, most often the hands. The wearable haptic device presented in this paper presents two innovations compared to the state of the art: it can elicit stimuli such as stroking, brushing or tickling the skin with an exchangeable tool, and it can be attached on several body parts, with a focus on the hairy skin. The device has been tested in a cue recognition experiment to prove its usability. In a second experiment, an embedded force sensor is used to measure the force applied by the tool on the skin and eventually detect if the tool-tip is moving on the skin or not. The results show that the device can be used for human studies and that motor stall condition can be deduced from the force profile periodicity.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication2015 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE-ROBIO 2015
    PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
    Pages297-302
    Number of pages6
    ISBN (Print)9781467396745
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016 Feb 24
    EventIEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE-ROBIO 2015 - Zhuhai, China
    Duration: 2015 Dec 62015 Dec 9

    Other

    OtherIEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE-ROBIO 2015
    CountryChina
    CityZhuhai
    Period15/12/615/12/9

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    Innovation
    Experiments
    Sensors

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Artificial Intelligence
    • Hardware and Architecture
    • Control and Systems Engineering

    Cite this

    Amiguet, J., Sessa, S., Bleuler, H., & Takanishi, A. (2016). Design of a wearable device for low frequency haptic stimulation. In 2015 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE-ROBIO 2015 (pp. 297-302). [7418783] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/ROBIO.2015.7418783

    Design of a wearable device for low frequency haptic stimulation. / Amiguet, Jerome; Sessa, Salvatore; Bleuler, Hannes; Takanishi, Atsuo.

    2015 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE-ROBIO 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2016. p. 297-302 7418783.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Amiguet, J, Sessa, S, Bleuler, H & Takanishi, A 2016, Design of a wearable device for low frequency haptic stimulation. in 2015 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE-ROBIO 2015., 7418783, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 297-302, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE-ROBIO 2015, Zhuhai, China, 15/12/6. https://doi.org/10.1109/ROBIO.2015.7418783
    Amiguet J, Sessa S, Bleuler H, Takanishi A. Design of a wearable device for low frequency haptic stimulation. In 2015 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE-ROBIO 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2016. p. 297-302. 7418783 https://doi.org/10.1109/ROBIO.2015.7418783
    Amiguet, Jerome ; Sessa, Salvatore ; Bleuler, Hannes ; Takanishi, Atsuo. / Design of a wearable device for low frequency haptic stimulation. 2015 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, IEEE-ROBIO 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2016. pp. 297-302
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